The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA

The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA

4261.0: Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Board 2

Abstract #56567

Knowledge of symptoms of heart attack and stroke and use of 9-1-1: United States, 2001

Henraya F McGruder, PhD1, A Malarcher, PhD2, Kurt Greenlund, PhD3, JB Croft, PhD2, and Theresa L Antoine, MPH2. (1) Cardiovascular Health Branch/ NCCDPHP, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy., NE MS K-47, Atlanta, GA 30341, 770-488-8266, hdd8@cdc.gov, (2) Cardiovascular Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 4770 Buford HWY NE, Mailstop K-47, Atlanta, GA 30341, (3) Cardiovascular Hlth Branch, Division of Adult & Community Hlth, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Hlth Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mailstop K-47, Atlanta, GA 30341

Background: Healthy People 2010 objectives include increasing the proportion of adults aware of heart attack and stroke signs/symptoms and who call 9-1-1 in response. Although some studies have reported African Americans are less likely than whites to correctly identify signs/symptoms, national data and ethnic differences have not been examined. Methods: We used the 2001 National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. population, to estimate awareness of symptoms of heart attack (pain in jaw, neck, back, arms, & shoulders; lightheadedness, chest pain, and shortness of breath) and stroke (weakness on one side [face, arm, or leg], confusion, severe headache, trouble seeing/speaking, loss of balance/dizziness) and use of 9-1-1 for a heart attack among 33,326 adults. Racial/ethnic comparisons were assessed by chi-squared statistics using SUDAAN. Results: In 2001, for all signs/symptoms of heart disease and stroke, whites were more knowledgeable than African Americans and Hispanics (p<.05). For example, 48.1% of whites identified all five heart attack symptoms, compared to 37.5% of African Americans and 26.5 % of Hispanics. Similarly, 63.4% of whites recognized all five stroke symptoms compared to 52.5% of African Americans and 39.2% of Hispanics. No racial/ethnic differences were observed concerning the proportion of persons calling 9-1-1 in response (whites [93.9%]; African Americans [95.0%]; Hispanics [92.3%]). Conclusions: Racial/ethnic disparities exist in the publicís knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms. Educational programs are needed to increase public awareness and to prompt immediate action in order to obtain appropriate care for heart attacks and stroke.

Learning Objectives:

Keywords: Ethnic Minorities, Healthy People 2000/2010

Presenting author's disclosure statement:
I do not have any significant financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with any organization/institution whose products or services are being discussed in this session.

Surveillance and Screening: Poster Session

The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA