The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA

The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA

3226.0: Monday, November 17, 2003 - 1:15 PM

Abstract #68972

Keeping in touch: Connecting young males to reproductive health care after high school

Bruce Armstrong, DSW1, Brad Kerner, BS1, David Bell, MD, MPH1, Lorraine Tiezzi, MS2, and Roger Vaughan, DrPH3. (1) Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Ave., B3, New York, NY 10032, 212-304-5247, ba5@columbia.edu, (2) Center for Community Health and Education, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Ave, B-3, New York, NY 10032, (3) Heilbrunn Departments of Population and Family Health and Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Ave, B-3, New York, NY 10032

Older adolescent and young adult males are more likely than females or younger adolescent males to engage in risk behaviors that compromise their health. They are more likely to be sexually active and to have multiple sexual partners, and less likely to use condoms. 18-24 year old men of color are also more likely to be uninsured and not have a regular health care provider. Many become increasingly disconnected from health care services when they graduate high school or leave school before graduating.

To address the unmet health needs of young men, the Mailman School of Public Health and New York Presbyterian Hospital jointly operate a network of highly utilized services for males in school- and community-based ambulatory clinic venues in upper Manhattan. 72% of males at the school are actively involved in SBC health education services; over 2,500 visits are made to the Young Menís Clinic (YMC) each year.

This paper presents the findings of formative research (focus groups) with students at the SBC to increase our understanding of feasible and effective outreach efforts that link male students to the YMC after graduation. We will also present the results of the outreach intervention. Of approximately 120 males who graduated over three academic years, half were randomly assigned to receive the intervention. Return rates and health care satisfaction rates will be compared between intervention and control groups. Implications for effective outreach interventions targeting a hard to reach population of young men will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

Keywords: Access and Services, Male Reproductive Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:
I do not have any significant financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with any organization/institution whose products or services are being discussed in this session.

Not the same old: Innovations in Teenage Pregnancy Prevention

The 131st Annual Meeting (November 15-19, 2003) of APHA