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Occupational exposures and the risk of prostate cancer in african-american men: The flint menís health study

Julie C. McLaughlin, MS, MPH1, Aruna V. Sarma, PhD2, Rodney Dunn, MS1, John T. Wei, MD3, James E. Montie, MD4, David Schottenfeld, MD5, and Kathleen A. Cooney, MD6. (1) Urology, University of Michigan, 1016 Women's Trailer, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, 734-663-7428, juliecm@med.umich.edu, (2) Urology, Epidemiology, University of Michigan, 1016 Women's Trailer, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, (3) Department of Surgery/Urology, The University of Michigan, 2916 Taubman Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0330, (4) Urology Surgery, University of Michigan, 2916 TC, 1500 E. Medical Center Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, (5) Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, The University of Michigan, 109 S. Observatory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, (6) Internal Medicine and Veterans Health Administration, University of Michigan, 7310 CCGC, Box 0946, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Introduction: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and the second leading cancer-related cause of death in the United States. Occupational history has been previously associated with disease risk. We examined the associations between occupational history and prostate cancer in a population-based case-control study of African-American men aged 40-79 using data from the Flint Menís Health Study. Methods: In 1996, 703 African-American men free of prostate cancer completed a detailed in-home epidemiologic interview on potential risk factors for prostate cancer including occupation and specific substance exposures. 129 African-American male residents of Genesee County, and diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1996-2001 were identified using the local cancer registry and completed the interview. Factors regarding occupational history were evaluated with respect to the development of prostate cancer, using multiple variable logistic regression. Results: We observed that in age-adjusted analyses, men with a history of spraying herbicides or working in welding/flame cutting had 2.34 (1.19, 4.62) and 1.61 (1.08, 2.40) fold greater odds of developing prostate cancer, respectively, as compared to men working in other occupations. In a final multivariate model adjusting for age, income, education, family history of prostate cancer, alcohol consumption status, and cigarettes smoking status, welding/flame cutting, asbestos and herbicides were significant predictors of the development of prostate cancer in African-American men. Conclusion: These data suggest that occupational history, including welding/flame cutting, asbestos and herbicides, are important factors in the development of prostate cancer in African-American men. Further evaluations are necessary to support these findings.

Learning Objectives:

Presenting author's disclosure statement:
I do not have any significant financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with any organization/institution whose products or services are being discussed in this session.

Dangerous Work: Occupational Epidemiology

The 132nd Annual Meeting (November 6-10, 2004) of APHA