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[ Recorded presentation ] Recorded presentation

Bullying and victimization behaviors among elementary school-aged youth: Results from the Healthy Passages Study

Melissa A. Fleschler, MS, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas - School of Public Health, University Center Tower, 7000 Fannin, 2672D, Houston, TX 77030, 713-500-9759, mfleschler@sph.uth.tmc.edu, Jaana Juvonen, PhD, University of California at Los Angeles/RAND, 1700 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401, Diana L. Paulk, PhD, Department of Psychology, Center for the Advancement of Youth Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 912 Building, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-1200, Jo Anne Grunbaum, EdD, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, Mailstop K-33, Atlanta, GA 30341, Susan Tortolero, PhD, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas - Houston, 7000 Fannin, Ste 2622, Houston, TX 77030, Michael Windle, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, Center for the Advancement of Youth Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, CH 415, 1530 3rd Ave S, Birmingham, AL 35294-1170, and Mark A. Schuster, MD, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, UCLA, Box 951752, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1752.

Bullying and victimization have been found to be serious problems among elementary school students. In addition, these behaviors are often associated with physical and mental health problems, as well as other risk behaviors. Little is known, however, about the diversity of experience across racial/ethnic groups. Healthy Passages, a community-based, multi-site longitudinal study of adolescent health includes bullying and victimization measures in a multi-dimensional assessment tool. Measures covered general bullying and victimization, as well as specific examples of each (e.g., hitting or slapping others, picking on others, being called names, being threatened, etc.). The tool was pilot-tested with 646 5th-grade youth in 2003. We selected a random sample of schools designed to obtain large numbers of Latinos, whites, and African Americans, and then recruited all 5th graders in each school. In response to the general measures, 18% and 7% of 5th graders, respectively, reported being bullied by others and bullying others a few times or more during the past 12 months. The studentsí reports of engaging in specific bullying behaviors three or more times during the past 30 days ranged from 2%-12%; specific victimization experiences ranged from 16%-33% for a few times or more during the past 12 months. There was no consistent gender pattern in the findings; however, African-American students were most likely to report both bullying and victimization. Interpersonal, family, and neighborhood correlates of these behaviors will be examined. Such data will aid researchers in further developing school-based anti-bullying intervention programs.

Learning Objectives:

Keywords: Adolescent Health, School Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:
I do not have any significant financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with any organization/institution whose products or services are being discussed in this session.

[ Recorded presentation ] Recorded presentation

School-Based Mental Health Programs and Services

The 132nd Annual Meeting (November 6-10, 2004) of APHA