147670 Development of an ESL curriculum to educate Chinese immigrants about physical activity

Tuesday, November 6, 2007: 12:48 PM

Vicky Taylor, MD, MPH , Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Swee May Cripe, PhD, MPH , Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Elizabeth Acorda, MA , Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Chong Teh, PhD , Cancer Control Research, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Gloria Coronado, PhD , Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Hoai Do, MPH , Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Erica Woodall, MPH , Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Gregory Hislop, MDCM , Cancer Control Research, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Regular physical activity reduces the risk of morbidity and mortality from many chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes and obesity). Multiple studies have shown that Asians in North America engage in less physical activity than the general population. One promising approach to health education for immigrants is the design and evaluation of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) curricula. The diagnostic component of the PRECEDE framework and findings from focus groups of Chinese immigrants were used to develop a physical activity ESL module. Two focus groups were conducted in Seattle, Washington and two were conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia. Only a few of the focus group participants described specific diseases that can be prevented by physical activity. Rather, the benefits of physical activity were commonly described in terms of improved blood circulation, immune responses, digestion, and reflexes. Some individuals noted that doing physical activity leads to greater harmony in familial relationships. The importance of peer pressure, mutual support, and the encouragement of friends in adhering to regular physical activity regimens were mentioned frequently. Lack of time, weather conditions, and financial costs were reported barriers to regular physical activity. The ESL curriculum aims to both promote physical activity and improve knowledge about physical activity. It includes seven ESL exercises (warm-up, vocabulary cards, information-gap, video, jigsaw, guided discussion, and problem/advice cards); and systematically addresses predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling factors. Our curriculum development methods could be replicated for other health education topics and in other limited English-speaking immigrant populations (e.g., Spanish-speaking).

Learning Objectives:
1. Recognize the potential role of ESL curricula in providing health education to immigrants. 2. List predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling factors that influence Chinese immigrantsí physical activity levels. 3. Describe physical activity ESL curriculum exercises for Chinese immigrants.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Any relevant financial relationships? No
Any institutionally-contracted trials related to this submission?

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.