155069 Lessons learned from a U.S. cross-agency emergency measles communication campaign during the 2006 World Cup

Tuesday, November 6, 2007

Gabrielle Benenson, MPH , Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Rebecca Myers, BS, TESL , Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Traci Augstosky-Lopez, MA , National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Stefanie Steele, RN, MPH , Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Phyllis Kozarsky, MD , Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Amanda Whatley, MPH, CHES , Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Rebekah Kunkel, MPH , Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
During 20052006, large outbreaks of measles were reported in several countries in Europe, including Germany. To help prevent the spread of measles into the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) worked closely with partners to develop a communication campaign for travelers and those assisting travelers arriving in the United States from the 2006 World Cup in Germany. Communication campaign activities included: Notifying state and local public health agencies about the measles outbreak. Developing a press release for the public, a measles Travel Health Alert Notice and poster for travelers, a fact sheet for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) staff, and a fact sheet for flight crews. Publishing the poster, flight crew fact sheet, and a Travel Notice on CDC's Travelers' Health website. Informing and enlisting assistance from CBP, airlines, health departments, airport authorities, and other partners to hang posters and heighten surveillance activities. Distributing and hanging posters in the airports. The health communication campaign provided an opportunity to test rapid communication dissemination and to evaluate communication channels that would be used during a public health emergency, such as an influenza pandemic. The need for rapid communication identified challenges with clearance review and dissemination protocols. It highlighted the importance of strong partnerships, ongoing dialogue between agencies, and pre-event identification of effective and rapid communication strategies. The campaign led to the development of a dissemination protocol for emergency health communication, improved existing relationships, and identified key stakeholders for future communications activities.

Learning Objectives:
List three partner agencies at ports of entry that must be involved in emergency health communication activities. Describe three health communication strategies that can be used to reach travelers. Identify two strategies for overcoming challenges to cross-agency emergency communication.

Keywords: Health Communications, Communicable Disease

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Any relevant financial relationships? No
Any institutionally-contracted trials related to this submission?

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.