162054 Renal cell carcinoma and body composition: Results from a case-control study

Wednesday, November 7, 2007: 1:35 PM

Ryan P. Theis, MPH , College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Suzanne M. Dolwick Grieb, MSPH , Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Dan Benardot, PhD, DHC, RD , College of Health and Human Sciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
Tariq Siddiqui, MD , Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Deborah Burr, PhD , College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
John Christopher, PhD , College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Nabih Asal, PhD , College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Background: Recent studies have found modest increases in risk for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) among those with high relative weight and body fat. The present study used a case-control design to further evaluate associations between RCC and body composition. Methods: Incident cases of RCC (n = 335) were identified from Florida hospital records and the state cancer registry, and population controls (n = 337) were identified from random-digit dialing. In-person interviews included height, weight, waist and hip size, skinfold thickness, and body fat percentage measurements. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression, controlled for age, sex, race, and smoking. Results: Cases were more likely than controls to be obese (BMI > 30)(OR = 1.53; 95% CI: 1.12 2.10) and to have 40% or greater body fat percentage (OR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.16 2.57), associations that were stronger among whites and men. Dose-response associations for both measures were significant at p = 0.022 and p = 0.001, respectively. Cases were more likely to have a waist-to-hip ratio greater than 1.00 (OR = 1.60; 95% CI: 1.03 2.49), especially among African-Americans. Skinfold measurements were greater among cases than controls at the thigh (p= 0.02) and trunk (p = 0.02). Correlation statistics demonstrated BMI to be a reliable indicator of body fat percentage (r = 0.67, p = 0.000). Conclusion: Risk of RCC increases between 50% and 70% for those scoring high on obesity indicators, which may explain the rising trend in RCC incidence in the U.S.

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the body composition factors most associated with increased risk of renal cell cancer. 2. Describe the association between body composition and renal cell cancer and its variation across demographic groups. 3. Assess the use of BMI as an indicator of obesity and a correlate for body fat percentage.

Keywords: Cancer, Obesity

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Any relevant financial relationships? No
Any institutionally-contracted trials related to this submission?

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

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