168552 Failure to Return for HIV, Hepatitis, and STI Test Results in Los Angeles County, California

Monday, October 27, 2008: 2:45 PM

Ryan M. Brooks, BA , Center for Behavioral Research and Services, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Grace L. Reynolds, DPA , Center for Behavioral Research and Services, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Dennis Fisher, PhD , Center for Behavioral Research and Services, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Lucy Napper, PhD , Center for Behavioral Research and Services, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Background: An estimated 4 million adults have tested for HIV, Hepatitis, and STIs in L. A. County using standard (non-rapid) testing and roughly 25% of them failed to return for test results. Understanding how to increase return rates will provide community health benefits.

Methods: The data (N = 997) were collected over a three-year period (2005 2007) and include only those clients receiving a standard (non-rapid) HIV test. Clients testing for multiple infections were provided with pre-test counseling, phlebotomy, a date to return for results, and a $5 non-cash incentive for returning for results. Bivariate analyses were used to determine the associations with failure to return.

Results: Factors associated with failure to return (18% of sample) include: no high school diploma or GED, χ2(1, N = 869) = 4.92, p = .02, living on the streets , χ2(1, N = 870)= 7.43, p < .01, low risk perception for contracting HIV, χ2(1, N = 872)= 9.39, p < .01, ever using nonprescription methadone, χ2(1, N = 871)= 6.11, p < .05, and receiving money from a family or friend in the last 30 days, χ2(1, N = 870)= 4.83, p < .05.

Conclusions: For some individuals (i.e., those with low education, opiate use, and marginal living situations) the non-cash incentive and the bundled tests were not effective in getting them to return for results. Rapid testing for HIV should be more universally available for these groups.

Learning Objectives:
1.Members of the audience will be introduced to the issue of bundled laboratory tests. 2.The audience will be able to describe the population that is failing to return for standard HIV, hepatitis and sexually transmitted disease test results. 3.The audience will learn about methods that can help reverse this trend.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have completed the final analysis on my own.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

See more of: Critical Research on HIV Testing
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