173953 Factors related to HPV prevalence for US Latinas

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Deanna Kepka, MPH, MA , Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Engelberta (Beti) Thompson, PhD , Public Health Sciences/Cancer Prevention Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Gloria Coronado, PhD , Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Latinas have almost a two-fold increased incidence of cervical cancer compared to non-Hispanic White women. Evidence shows that nearly all cases of cervical cancer are due to infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). In 2006, the CDC approved a new vaccine for young women ages 9 to 26 that protects against the primary types of HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) that cause approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Few studies have looked at the relationship between socioeconomic characteristics, sexual behavior, and acculturation on HPV prevalence in US Latinas.

Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2004), we conducted univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine the relationship between socioeconomic characteristics, sexual behavior, and acculturation level of US Latinas and HPV prevalence for the 529 Latinas who participated in the NHANES medical examination. Factors related to both HPV infection in general and high risk HPV infection were investigated.

Preliminary findings demonstrate that 126 of 503 Latinas with adequate test results were HPV positive (25%), mean age 28.6 (age range 14 60, SD 12.7). With older age, odds decreased for high risk HPV infection (OR .84, 95% CI .73-.97). Latinas who had sex for the first time before age 15 had an increased odds for high risk HPV infection (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.02-11.39) than other Latinas. Latinas who spoke only or mostly Spanish during their childhood had a decreased odds for high risk HPV infection (OR .30, 95% CI .13-.67) compared to other Latinas.

Improved understanding of the factors that relate to HPV prevalence for US Latinas may result in the development of more effective interventions that aim to lessen HPV risk and promote the HPV vaccine to reduce cervical cancer incidence for US Latinas.

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe rates of HPV infection (overall and high risk HPV) of US Latinas by socioeconomic characteristics. 2. Identify the relationship between acculturation level and sexual behavior and HPV infection for US Latinas. 3. Discuss how investigation of factors related to HPV infection for US Latinas may improve HPV vaccine promotion efforts.

Keywords: Latinas, Cervical Cancer

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: This is my area of dissertation research at the University of Washington.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.