182185 Overweight among Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Wednesday, October 29, 2008: 1:00 PM

Juhee Kim, ScD , Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL
Bo Fernhall, PhD , Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL
Objectives: To examine the prevalence of overweight among children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and their difference by medication.

Method: We conducted a secondary data analysis using the National Survey of Children's Health 2003(aged 6-17 years, n=62,476). The definition of ADHD is used from the question of "Has a doctor or health professional ever told that [study child] has ADD or ADHD?" The odds of overweight (BMI≥ 95% percentile) were estimated among children with ADHD who were or were not taking medication compared with children without ADHD. Covariates were age, race, education, poverty, family structure, number of family meals, computer and reading hours, TV viewing hours, physical activity, sleep, participation of organized activities, and supportive neighborhood. Further, we adjusted weights and multistage sampling design effects in multivariate logistic regression models.

Results: Overall 9% of U.S. children had either ADD or ADHD in 2003. Only girls with ADHD had a higher rate of overweight than that of girls without ADHD (20% vs. 16%). However, both boys and girls with ADHD and currently NOT taking medication were more likely to be overweight than those without ADHD (OR (95% CI) for Boys, 1.44 (1.13-1.84) and Girls, 1.79 (1.20-2.67).

Conclusions: The prevalence of overweight among children with ADHD is dependent on sex and medication. Children with ADHD who not take ADHD medication have a higher risk of overweight than those taking medication and compared to children without ADHD. These data suggest that medication use should be carefully considered in children with ADHD.

Learning Objectives:
Girls with ADHD are more likely to be overweight than those without ADHD. Boys with ADHD who do not take ADHD medication are more likely to be overweight than those take ADHD medication. . The impact of ADHD medication on the risk of overweight is different by gender.

Keywords: Disability, Obesity

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am principal investigator who conducted this secondary data analysis.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.