196595 Association between Body Mass Index and Oral Health Indices in High School Students in Southern Nevada

Sunday, November 8, 2009

Marcia M. Ditmyer, PhD, CHES , School of Dental Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV
Katherine Howard, PhD , MS 7410, University of Nevada Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine, Las Vegas, NV
Mildred A. McClain, PhD , School of Dental Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV
Georgia Dounis, PhD, DDM , School of Dental Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV
Edward Herschaft, DDS , MS 7510, University of Nevada Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine, Las Vegas, NV
Christine Bergman, PhD, RD , University of Nevada Las Vegas, Department of Food and Beverage, Las Vegas, NV
Susan VanBeuge, MSN, APN, BC , MS 3018, University of Nevada Las Vegas, School of Nursing, Las Vegas, NV
Connie Mobley, PhD, RD , School of Dental Medicine, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess BMI-for-age weight and oral health indices to examine preliminary associations between general and oral health status of adolescents in Southern Nevada schools.

Methods: A convenience sample from two high schools was recruited (one in higher socioeconomic (SES) and one in lower SES areas identified through zip codes by median annual household incomes). A power analysis (power= 0.80,p=0.05,d=0.20) determined a projected sample size of 75 subjects per school. Intraclass correlations determined inter-rater and intra-rater reliability for each component of the assessments completed (oral health screenings,r=0.98; anthropometric screenings,r=0.99, bacterial collection,r=0.99). Variables of interest included: 1) scores from YRBSS questions, 2) DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth) indices, 3) BMI-for-age, and 4) oral bacterial counts. BMI-for-age was computed using the BioMeasure Youth Systemô. Obesity was defined as BMI at or above CDC 85th percentile criteria. A salivary CRT bacteria kit determined S. mutans and lactobacilli counts. Pearson product moment correlations identified associations between BMI, bacterial levels, and DMFT indices.

Results: To date, data from school 1 (high SES) has been completed. Ninety-one students (boys =41;girls=50) were screened. Prevalence outcomes indicated slightly higher rates of obesity (20.9%, n=19)(boys=17%;n=7;girls=24%;n=12) compared to NHANES 2003-2006 (17.6%). Significant results were found between BMI and bacteria counts (r=0.311,p=0.04); BMI and DMFT indices (r=0.553,p=0.001), and DMFT and Bacteria counts (r=0.391;p=0.03).

Conclusions: Results suggest a link between obesity and oral health status. The strength of this association is projected to increase. Results support necessary interventions as Nevadans face future health challenges.

Learning Objectives:
1. Share comparative data about the benefits of added fluoride in health status of Nevada youth. 2. Learn about ways of analyzing and comparing state-wide data. 3. Assess oral health status by demographic differences controlling for fluoride in Nevada adolescents. 4. Identify target areas of oral health needs of Nevada adolescents.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: expert in population based screenings, BMI assessment and oral health research and PI on this study
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.