202719 Lessons learned from the five-year CDC Tribal motor vehicle injury prevention program conducted in collaboration with four American Indian Tribes

Monday, November 9, 2009

Robert J. Letourneau, MPH , Health Behavior and Health Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
Carolyn E. Crump, PhD , Health Behavior and Health Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
L.J. David Wallace, MSEH , Division of Unintentional Injury, National Center for Injury Prevention & Control, CDC, Atlanta, GA
Rebecca Boyd, MSPH , Division of Unintentional Injury, National Center for Injury Prevention & Control, CDC, Atlanta, GA
Background: Program evaluation results from the landmark five-year Tribal Motor Vehicle Injury Prevention Program (TMVIPP) funded by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention & Control demonstrate the value of applying effective strategies to prevent motor vehicle (MV) injuries/death. Despite a 34% decrease over 20 years in MV-related death rates for Native Americans (NA), the 2002 NA MV death rate was almost two times greater than the U.S. national rate. In response to this disparity, from 2004-2009 the CDC directly funded four American Indian Tribes to apply evidence-based strategies from the Community Guide to Preventive Services for reducing motor vehicle injury/death, including three reservation-based Tribes in the West and one non-reservation Tribe in the Midwest United States. Methods: Review of TMVIPP documents (e.g., progress reports/funding applications), evaluation data, intensive evaluator observations, and interviews/focus groups with TMVIPP staff are used to describe core elements, key characteristics, and collaborations that facilitated or limited implementation of effective strategies in Tribal communities. Results: TMVIPP funding required dedicated staff, focus on effective strategies (e.g., new/strengthened laws, increased enforcement, use of media) and real-time program evaluation. These requirements enabled Tribes to show measurable success (e.g., in reports/presentations at national conferences) regarding increased sobriety checkpoints/saturation patrols and increased occupant restraint use. Conclusions: Translation lessons learned (e.g., emphasis on evidence-based strategies, technical assistance) from the TMVIPP, CDC's first direct funding to Tribes, can guide future funding provided directly to Tribes by state/national entities seeking to build Tribal capacity to address MV injuries.

Learning Objectives:
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the CDCís Tribal Motor Vehicle Injury Prevention Program. 2. Identify the effective strategies used at four Tribes to reduce impaired driving and increase occupant restraint use. 3. Discuss the challenges and successes faced in Tribal communities and lessons learned in translating effective MV strategies in Tribal communities.

Keywords: American Indians, Injury Prevention

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I was involved with all project activities.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.