202913 Influences on Tobacco Use Among Urban Hispanic Young Adults: Findings from A Qualitative Study

Monday, November 9, 2009

Jennifer D. McCleary-Sills, MPH , Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Evelyn Rosario , Community Outreach, Esperanza Center, Baltimore, MD
Lee Bone, MPH, RN , Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Frances Stillman, EdD , Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Among Hispanics, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death for men and the second leading cause of cancer death for women. By the age of 15, 20% of Hispanic youth are regular smokers, and 29% are regular smokers by the age of 23. Over a fifth of Hispanics in Baltimore City use tobacco regularly, a higher prevalence than among Hispanics at the national level. The present research sought to explore the social and environmental influences and norms that encourage or discourage tobacco use among Hispanic young adults in Baltimore. In collaboration with several community stakeholders, we conducted focus groups with Hispanic young adults 18-24 years old. Participants were recruited from a community-based service organization and invited to take part in one of four focus groups segregated by gender and smoking status. A total of 13 young men and 11 young women participated. Data from these focus groups indicate that cultural identity and gender norms leverage substantial influence in young adults' decision about whether, where, and with whom to smoke. The data also suggest multiple social and familial influences on their smoking and non-smoking behaviors. Participants also identified smoking practices and clear brand preferences that they feel distinguish Hispanics from other racial and ethnic groups. Despite acknowledging the high price of cigarettes, cost was not mentioned a factor influential in their smoking decisions. These results provide essential guidance for the development of appropriate intervention strategies and policy recommendations to eliminate tobacco use among Hispanic young adults in Baltimore.

Learning Objectives:
-Identify the social and environmental influences that encourage or discourage tobacco use among Hispanic young adults in urban Baltimore; -Design appropriate intervention strategies and policy recommendations to eliminate tobacco use among Hispanic young adults in urban Baltimore.

Keywords: Tobacco, Hispanic Youth

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a second year doctoral student at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where my studies focus on social and behavioral interventions to address health disparities. My previous research and work experience has been with vulnerable populations here in the United States as well as in Southern Africa, the Middle East, and throughout Latin America. The present research was the first phase of a community-based participatory research project in East Baltimore conducted under the auspices of the Institute for Global Tobacco Control. For this first phase, I created the research instrument, conducted the focus group discussions and performed data coding and analysis. I am also the researcher responsible for maintaining relationships with the projectís community partners. As a result, I have both a broad understanding of the project and an intimate familiarity with the data to be presented.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.