204816 Project TRUST: A state-wide collaborative effort in New Mexico to develop and implement policy recommendations to improve behavioral health care for American Indian adolescents

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Jessica R. Goodkind, PhD , Prevention Research Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Kimberly Ross-Toledo, BA , Coalition for Healthy & Resilient Youth, Gallup, NM
Susie John, MD, MPH , Teen Life Center, Shiprock, NM
Janie Lee Hall, RN, PNP , Office of School & Adolescent Health, New Mexico Department of Health, Gallup, NM
Lucille Ross, MS , Office of School & Adolescent Health, New Mexico Department of Health, Gallup, NM
Lance Freeland, BS , Prevention Research Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Ernest Coletta, BS , University of New Mexico, Center for Rural and Community Behavioral Health, Albuquerque, NM
Twila Becenti-Fundark, MSW, LISW, BCD , Office of School & Adolescent Health, New Mexico Department of Health, Farmington, NM
Charlene Poola, MSW, LISW , University of New Mexico, Center for Rural and Community Behavioral Health, Albuquerque, NM
Regina Begay-Roanhorse , New Mexico Assembly for School Based Health Care & Dine Local Collaborative 15, Albuquerque, NM
Christopher Lee, BS , Prevention Research Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
American Indian/Alaska Native youth represent the resiliency and continued survival of many Nations and Tribes. However, they have the highest rate of suicide among 15-24 year olds in the United States. This glaring mental health disparity is rooted in both current and past oppression experienced by AI/AN individuals, families, communities, and nations. In order to promote the mental health and well-being of Native youth, it is imperative to understand this historical context and to foster change on multiple levels. With the aims of elucidating the causes of behavioral health disparities, eliminating them, and improving behavioral health care for Native youth, a partnership of providers, community members, and university faculty and staff was formed. The Project TRUST (Trust, Responsiveness, Understanding, Self-Determination, and Transformation) partnership completed a comprehensive literature review; conducted advisory meetings with 71 American Indian youth, parents, and elders; surveyed 25 service providers; and engaged in ongoing consultation with traditional practitioners. Results from the multiple sources were content analyzed and 32 policy, provider and research recommendations were developed that recognize the importance of rebuilding trust, moving beyond exclusive reliance on western models of care and that seek to foster transformation of individuals, families, communities, behavioral health service systems of care, and social structures.

Learning Objectives:
1. Explain the goal of Project TRUST to promote the mental health and well-being of Native youth, their families, and communities by building a culture of trust 2. Describe research and literature review findings, and the perspectives of community participants, providers, and traditional practitioners in the areas of: a. cultural competency b. resiliency and protective factors for American Indian adolescents c. historical trauma and institutional racism, d. culturally-appropriate behavioral health interventions and treatments e. challenges to behavioral health care for American Indian youth 3. Identify policy, provider, and research recommendations, and potential opportunities for collaboration in the areas of advocacy and implementation

Keywords: Child/Adolescent Mental Health, American Indians

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have a PhD in community psychology and more than 12 years experience conducting community-based participatory research. I have numerous funded research studies and peer reviewed articles and book chapters.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.