205056 Acculturation or accumulation of discrimination among Latina immigrant women: Findings from the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) Survey

Sunday, November 8, 2009

Angie Denisse Otiniano, MPH , School of Public Health Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Fathima Wakeel, PhDc , Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA
Eunice Muthengi Karei, MPH, MSW , Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Akilah Wise, MSPH , Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Michael C. Lu, MD, MPH , Department of Community Health Sciences and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA
OBJECTIVE: To identify levels of discrimination among Latina immigrants by length of stay in the US and age at immigration. METHODS: Data from the first wave of 2007 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) Survey was used. LAMB is a mail sample survey with telephone follow-up for non-respondents based on multistage clustered design. Preliminary analyses were based on the responses of 235 Latina immigrants with a live birth in 2007 in Los Angeles County. Discrimination was measured using Krieger's seven-item discrimination scale. The relationship between discrimination and length of stay and discrimination and age at immigration was examined using Pearson's chi square tests. RESULTS: Overall, 27% of all Latinas reported discrimination during their entire lifetime compared to 55% of Black, 34% of Asian, and 18% of White women (p<0.0001). Among immigrant Latinas, those in the US more than 20 years were more likely to perceive discrimination; 50% who lived in the US more than 20 years reported discrimination compared to 23% who lived in the US 10- 20 years and 22% who lived in the US less than 10 years (p=0.004). Similar trends were found by age at immigration; 39% who immigrated at 10 years old or younger reported discrimination compared to 22% who immigrated at 11 to 19 years old and 25% who immigrated at 20 years or older (p=0.079). DISCUSSION: These findings suggest the longer Latina immigrants are the US and the younger their age at immigration, the more likely they are of perceiving discrimination throughout their lifetime.

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this session, the participants will be able to Discuss the importance of acculturation on maternal health and pregnancy outcomes; Discuss the importance of perceived discrimination on maternal health and pregnancy outcomes; Discuss the relationship between perceived discrimination, length of stay, and age at immigration.

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have been working with LAMB for over a year as a first year and second year PhD student.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.