205217 Ratings of Neighborhood Safety, Maternal Stress, Birth Outcomes: Findings from the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby Survey (LAMBS)

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Akilah Michelle Wise, MSPH , Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA
Angie Denisse Otiniano, MPH , School of Public Health Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Eunice Muthengi Karei, MPH, MSW , Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Fathima Wakeel, PhDc , Department of Community Health Sciences, University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA
Michael C. Lu, MD, MPH , Department of Community Health Sciences and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA
APHA Abstract

Title: Ratings of Neighborhood Safety, Maternal Stress, Birth Outcomes: Findings from the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby Survey (LAMBS)

Wise AM, Otiano AD, Muthengi E, Wakeel F, Lu MC

Objective: To identify perceived neighborhood factors that are mediated through maternal stress and contribute to birth weight. Methods: Data from the first wave of 2007 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) survey was used. LAMB is a mail sample survey with telephone follow-up for non-respondents based on multistage clustered design. Preliminary analyses were based on the responses of 1119 women with a live birth in 2007 in Los Angeles County. Safety subscale emerged from neighborhood scale after factor analysis. Stress was measured using Cohen's perceived stress scale. Relationships were assessed using Pearson's chi-square test, linear and logisic regression. Results: 9.7% of infants were born with low birth weight (<2500 grams) and 17.25% were born pre-term (<37 weeks gestation). The mean Safety subscale rating was 3.51 and 12.49% reported feeling stress during pregnancy. Stress was correlated with the Safety subscale (r= -.13 p-value <.0001) but not a significant predictor of birth weight or pre-term birth. One in four women (24.4%) who reported unfavorable Police Protection had a pre-term infant, compared to 14.1% of women who rated it favorable (p-value < .05). Safety subscale was not significant in logistic regression model. Police Protection item was significant (p-value <05); the odds of having a low birth weight baby decreased by 17% for each increase in Police Protection rating. All models controlled for mother's age, education, marital status, race, and use of alcohol, and drugs. Discussion: Findings suggest perception of unsafe neighborhood is predictive of low birth weight infants and pre-term birth.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the session, the participant will be able to discuss:

Discuss the importance of safe residential locations for pregnant women

Discuss the potential consequences of unsafe residential locations on pregnant women

Learning Objectives:
Identify perceived neighborhood factors that are mediated through maternal stress and contribute to birth weight

Keywords: Infant Health, Maternal Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Independent research for topic
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.