205538 Salmonella, Shigella and Campylobacter: Disparities in Houston, Texas (2000 2007)

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Brenda J. Thorne, MS, DTM , Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
William Bryant, MS , Bureau of Epidemiology, Office of Surveillance and Public Health Preparedness, Houston Department of health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Ihuoma Azuike, MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology, Office of Surveillance and Public Health Preparedness, Houston Department of health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Adebowale Awosika-Olumo, MD, MS, MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology, City of Houston, Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Stephen G. Long, MD , Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Yufang Zhang, MD MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Kirstin Short, MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Hyewon Lee-Han, PhD , Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Salmonella, Shigella and Campylobacter are among the most common bacterial diseases in the United States (US) and are monitored by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). CDC estimates that about 76 million cases, 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths related to foodborne diseases (FBD) occur each year in the US. For disease prevention purposes, it is vital to understand the FBD epidemiology in a large metropolitan city such as Houston.

Eight year surveillance data (2000 2007) were extracted from the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) database. Houston population was obtained from the US Census Bureau. Average annual incidence rates of Salmonella, Shigella and Campylobacter were computed by age, ethnicity and gender.

The eight year average incidence rate of Shigella (10 per 100,000) in the Houston population exceeded the US average (6.77). Hispanics are disproportionately affected by Shigella (11.1) compared to Whites (3.5) and Salmonella (9.9) compared to Blacks (6.5). For all three FBD, the incidence rates of children less than 10 years of age are up to 10 times the rate of those older than 10 and those living in the Southwest (70.8) and Northeast (69.1) regions of Houston have the highest incidence rates.

The study showed obvious disparities in the epidemiology of FBD in Houston. The understanding of this epidemiology in relation to ethnicity and age will enhance both the prevention efforts and outbreak control measures of the local health department. This reduces the disease burden in these populations.

Learning Objectives:
Identify the most common foodborne diseases that occur in a large multi-ethnic metropolitan city like Houston. Describe the ethnic and age disparities of common foodborne diseases that occur in Houston. Explain how disease surveillance aids prevention efforts and decreases disease burden in a population.

Keywords: Health Disparities, Hispanic

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I do not have any conflict of interest.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.