206486 Relationship between Body Mass Index and Chronic Kidney Disease among Appalachian Adults

Monday, November 9, 2009: 11:20 AM

Loretta R. Cain, MPH , Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV
Alan Ducatman, MD, MSc , Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV
Anoop Shankar, MD, PhD , Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV
Background: While some previous studies reported a positive association between body mass index (BMI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), others reported that this association was entirely explained by factors such as diabetes and hypertension. Also several studies reported that an association was present among men, but not women.

Hypothesis: We examined the hypothesis that BMI is positively associated with CKD, separately in men and women.

Methods: We analyzed data from the C8 Health Study, a population-based cross-sectional study of Appalachian adults residing in six communities in Ohio and West Virginia, who were aged 18 years and free of cardiovascular disease (n=48,567, 53% women). BMI categories were defined as normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2) or obese (30 kg/m2). The main outcome of interest was CKD (n=2954), defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

Results: In men, we found a positive association between BMI and CKD, independent of age, race-ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to normal weight men (referent), the multivariable odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) of CKD was 1.17 (0.96-1.43) for overweight men and 1.35 (1.09-1.66) for obese men; p-trend <0.0001. In contrast, in women, we found no association between BMI and CKD. Compared to normal weight women (referent), the OR (95% CI) was 1.06 (0.93-1.21) for overweight women and 0.93 (0.82-1.07) for obese women; p-trend <0.0001.

Conclusion: Higher BMI levels are associated with CKD in men, but not women, in a population-based study of Appalachian adults.

Learning Objectives:
1. To examine the relationship between body mass index and chronic kidney disease 2. To analyze the effect of confounding factors such as age, race-ethnicity, education level, smoking status, drinking status, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol in the relation between body mass index and chronic kidney disease 3. To discuss the role of body mass index in chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I completed all analysis concerning this abstract.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

See more of: Chronic Disease Epidemiology
See more of: Epidemiology