206586 Association between the perceived food environment and reported self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption among adults participating in the National Cancer Institute Food Attitudes and Behaviors (FAB) Survey

Tuesday, November 10, 2009: 9:10 AM

Temitope Erinosho, PhD , Health Promotion Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
April Oh, PhD, MPH , Health Promotion Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
Richard Moser, PhD , Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
Kia Davis, MPH , Health Communications Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
Linda Nebeling, PhD , Health Promotion Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
Amy L. Yaroch, PhD , Health Promotion Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
Few studies have examined the association between the perceived food environment and self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable (FV) intake. Using data from the 2007 National Cancer Institute Food Attitudes and Behaviors (FAB) survey, we evaluated the association between adults' perception of their food environment and self-efficacy to consume FVs. Data were collected via mail with a final sample of 3,397 participants (57% response rate) and an oversampling of African-Americans. Self-efficacy was measured as a scale (alpha=0.85) based on five items that asked participants how confident they were that they could eat FVs in a variety of situations (e.g., when really hungry, tired, instead of sweets, when junk foods are around, while at work). Measures of the food environment included perceptions of restaurant and neighborhood FV availability (e.g., enough choices, availability, and ease of obtaining FVs in restaurants, difficulty of purchasing FVs in neighborhood). Data were weighted, and analyzed using SAS v.9.1. Multivariate analyses found that adults reported greater self-efficacy to consume FVs if participants perceived that restaurants they visited served fruit (B=0.25, p=0.004). Respondents reported lower self-efficacy to consume FVs if they perceived it was difficult for them to get FVs when they ate out (B=-0.39, p<0.0001). Perceived access to vegetables on restaurant menus, and access to FVs in one's neighborhood were not associated with self-efficacy to consume FVs. Study findings suggest availability of FVs in neighborhood restaurants as a potentially important setting to promote self-efficacy for consuming FVs and consequently increasing FV intake among the public.

Learning Objectives:
1.Describe the relationship between adultsí perception of their food environment and self-efficacy to consume fruits and vegetables. 2.Discuss how the study findings may be used to promote self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption among the public.

Keywords: Self-Efficacy, Food and Nutrition

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I was involved in the development of the research concept, data analysis, and reviewed drafts of the presentation.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.