206667 Epidemiology of cigarette smoking among Cambodian Americans

Monday, November 9, 2009

Robert Friis, PhD , Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Mohammed R. Forouzesh, MPH, PhD, CHES , Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Alan Safer, PhD , Department of Mathematics and Statistics, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Claire Garrido-Ortega, MPH , Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Che Wankie, MPH , Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Paula Griego, BS , Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Kirsten Trefflich, MPA , Cambodian Association of America, Long Beach, CA
Kimthai Kuoch , Cambodian Association of America, Long Beach, CA
We examined the prevalence of smoking among Cambodian Americans in Long Beach, CA. Although smoking is believed to be prevalent in this population, data are lacking. A random sample of respondents (n = 680) was obtained from census tracts with high concentrations of Cambodian Americans. A cross-sectional survey obtained data regarding demographic variables (age, gender, marital status, and education) and tobacco use history. Cigarette smokers were defined as current smokers (persons who had smoked 100 or more cigarettes during their lifetimes and who currently smoked). The prevalence of current smokers was 13.3% (95% CI = 11.9 14.7); the sex-specific prevalences were 23.0% (95% CI = 20.4 25.6) and 6.1% (95% CI = 4.8 7.4) for males and females, respectively. The mean age of current smokers was 46.5 years (range = 18 to 92 years) and did not differ significantly by gender. A multivariate logistic regression analysis examined demographic predictors of smoking status. Significant predictor variables included gender, marital status, and education. The odds of smoking were 9.5 times (95% CI = 4.7 19.1) higher among males than among females. The odds of smoking were 2.8 times (95% CI = 1.4 5.8) higher among those with less than a high school education in comparison with those who had higher levels of education. The odds of smoking for married persons were 2.1 times (95% CI = 1.2 3.9) higher than for single persons. We concluded that smokers tended to be male, married, and have less than a high school education.

Learning Objectives:
1) Gain information about the prevalence of smoking among Cambodian Americans. 2) Identify demographic factors associated with tobacco use among Cambodian Americans. 3) Identify components of a culturally appropriate tobacco cessation program for Cambodian Americans.

Keywords: Smoking, Health Risks

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have a Ph.D. degree and am a research/faculty member. I have written articles on this topic and participated in prior programs.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.