215483 Physical activity and asthma: The role of obesity

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Shahed Iqbal, PhD, MBBS , National Center for Environmental Health/Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA
Isabela C. Ribeiro, Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer , National Center for Environmental Health/Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA
Fuyuen Yip, PhD , National Center for Environmental Health/Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA
Fernando Holguin, MD , National Center for Environmental Health/Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Chamblee, GA
Physical activity is recommended for youths and adults with asthma. Asthma and physical activity individually has been associated with body mass index (BMI), and BMI may play an important role in the relationship between them. The objective of this study was to determine the association between Leisure Time Physical Activity (LTPA) and asthma status stratified by BMI levels among youths and adults in a nationally representative sample. We also explored the relationship between LTPA and asthma morbidity. Data for persons aged 1645 years (N=7040) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20012004 were analyzed. Associations between asthma status (i.e., current, previous, or never) and LTPA, as measured in metabolic equivalent (MET)-minutes, were determined using multivariate linear regression procedures stratified by BMI levels (<25 vs. ≥25). Log-linear models were used to determine the association between LTPA and asthma morbidity (e.g., wheezing). Overweight and obese individuals (BMI ≥25) with current asthma had 29% (95% confidence interval = 2%, 48%; p=0.04) fewer LTPA MET-minutes than those who never had asthma. No significant differences were observed in LTPA by asthma status among the overall study population and individuals with BMI <25. LTPA was also not associated with having asthma attacks or the number of wheezing episodes in the last 12 months. Overweight and obese persons with asthma are less active than their counterparts without asthma. However, LTPA was not associated with asthma morbidity in this cross-sectional sample. Increased PA should be emphasized in the asthma management plan for overweight and obese persons with asthma.

Learning Areas:
Environmental health sciences
Epidemiology
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe the physical activity levels of individuals with asthma 2. Assess the association between physical activity and asthma 3. Explain the role of obesity in the association between physical activity and asthma

Keywords: Asthma, Physical Activity

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a physician with a doctorate degree in epidemiology. I have been involved in asthma and respiratory health outcome research for the last 5 years and have publications on the subject in peer reviewed journals.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.