215848 Association between depressive symptoms and anxiety and use of oral health services and tooth loss among U.S. adults

Monday, November 8, 2010

Catherine A. Okoro, PhD, MS , Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Tara W. Strine, MPH , Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Paul Eke, PhD , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Satvinder Dhingra, MPH , Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Lina S. Balluz, ScD, MPH , Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Background: Few studies have examined the relationship between use of oral health services and tooth loss and mental health disorders; and those that have, produced mixed results.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the associations among depression, anxiety, use of oral health services, and tooth loss.

Methods: Data were analyzed for 246,875 noninstitutionalized adults in 48 states/territories that participated in the 2006 and 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Results: Men and women with 15 missing teeth, 631 missing teeth, and those who were edentulous were significantly more likely to have current depression than those without tooth loss; and those who had 15 missing teeth and 631 missing teeth were more likely to have a lifetime diagnosed anxiety than those without tooth loss. Women who had used oral health services in the past year were significantly less likely to have current depression than those who had not. Notably, men who had accessed oral health services in the past year were significantly more likely to have lifetime diagnosed anxiety than those who had not.

Conclusions: Dental health professionals have an opportunity to screen for depression and anxiety as well as the usage of psychotropic medications during the provision of oral health services. Mental health professionals should encourage their patients to obtain oral health services.

Learning Areas:
Advocacy for health and health education
Epidemiology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Describe the association between depression and anxiety and use of oral health services and tooth loss.

Keywords: Depression, Oral Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I oversee epidemiological research using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.