217423 Assessing the Impact of the Houston STD Mobile Clinic in Vulnerable Populations through Data Mapping

Sunday, November 7, 2010

Hickmon Friday, MPH; MPA , Bureau of HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Biru Yang, MPH, PhD , American College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, Houston, TX
Riju Stephen, MS , Community Health Statistics, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Michael Thomas, MPH , Bureau of HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Lupita Thornton, BS , Bureau of HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
M. Aaron Sayegh, PhD, MPH , Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX
Background: In response to the 2007 outbreak of syphilis in Houston, Texas, the City of Houston deployed two mobile units to provide testing among vulnerable populations. Research regarding outbreaks has increasingly incorporated a variety of social, behavioral and economic data into traditional mapping.

Purpose: To map the coverage areas of the mobile clinics in relationship to the incidence of syphilis for 2007. The results of this analysis have direct implications for the logistics of mobile clinic use for outbreak response to the syndemic of STDs.

Methods: The incidence of syphilis was mapped using the count of patients per zip code. The sites and the frequency of mobile clinic stops were overlaid to the incidence map to assess the spatial variations. Socio-economic data from the US Census of the zip codes allowed researchers to identify any gaps in mobile clinic service according to disease burden. ArcGIS was used to create the maps.

Results: These maps combine administrative, epidemiological and geographic data in a graphical form. The overlay of data addresses fundamental questions of program effectiveness that include service utilization, intensity and penetration of programs into the targeted population.

Conclusions: This project demonstrates that the utility of GIS mapping technology for intervention/prevention planning. Results also indicate the utility of mobile clinics for outbreak response and targeted outreach to populations for whom mobility, access and/or travel to treatment is a significant barrier. -->

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Epidemiology
Program planning
Protection of the public in relation to communicable diseases including prevention or control

Learning Objectives:
1. List major challenges and benefits to using GIS technologies to evaluate mobile unitís deployment. 2. Describe the processes of how data are obtained and applied in GIS. 3. Discuss the application of GIS in program planning and evaluation.

Keywords: Geographic Information Systems, STD Prevention

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I am the data manager for the STD prevention program.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.