217520 Effect of perceived neighborhood norms on binge drinking and illicit drug use among non-Hispanic Asian American and White adults in the United States

Monday, November 8, 2010 : 10:48 AM - 11:06 AM

Ning Rosenthal, MD, PhD, MPH , County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health, Tobacco Control and Prevention Program, Los Angeles, CA
Susan D. Cochran, PhD, MS , Epidemiology, UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA
William McCarthy, PhD , Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA
Vickie M. Mays, PhD, MSPH , Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Objective: To investigate the association between perceived neighborhood norms and binge drinking and illicit drug use among non-Hispanic Whites and Asian Americans; to test the interaction between norms and race or, among Asian Americans, nativity on these behaviors. Methods: Data from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health were used, including 25,608 White and 1,054 Asian American adults (332 U.S.-born and 722 foreign-born). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between perceived neighborhood norms and binge drinking and illicit drug use as well as the interactions between norms and race or nativity. Results: Perceived favorable neighborhood norms for trying marijuana or hashish and daily alcohol drinking were associated with higher odds of reporting illicit drug use (Adjusted odds ratio (aOR) =2.54; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.133.04) and binge drinking (aOR=1.56; 95% CI: 1.411.73), respectively. No interaction between norms and race was observed. Among U.S.-born Asian Americans, perceived favorable neighborhood norms for trying marijuana or hashish and daily alcohol drinking were associated with over three-fold increase in odds of reporting illicit drug use or binge drinking. Among foreign-born Asian Americans, only the association between perceived norms concerning marijuana or hashish and illicit drug use was significant. Conclusions: Perceived favorable neighborhood norms are associated with higher odds of reporting binge drinking or illicit drug use in both racial groups. The effect of perceived neighborhood norms may vary across nativity groups among Asian Americans. Future substance use intervention programs might benefit from changing related neighborhood norms.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Evaluate the association between perceived neighborhood norms, binge drinking, and illicit drug use among non-Hispanic Whites and Asian Americans. Describe the interaction between norms and race or, among Asian Americans, nativity on illicit drug use behaviors.

Keywords: Asian Americans, Binge Drinking

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have participated every stage of the study since the conceptual period and co-wrote the manuscript.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.