218326 Sociodemographic Correlates of Workplace Eye Injuries

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 : 1:18 PM - 1:33 PM

Alberto J. Caban-Martinez, MPH , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - Occupational Research Group, Miami, FL
David J. Lee, PhD , Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Lora E. Fleming, MD, PhD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - OHH Center and NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Kristopher L. Arheart, EdD , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine - NIOSH Research Group, Miami, FL
Evelyn Davila, MPH , Stempel School of Public Health, Florida International University, Miami, FL
Tainya Clarke, MPH, MS , Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Jonathan K. Kish, MPH , Ohhc, University of Miami, Key Biscayne, FL
OBJECTIVE: Evidence suggests that some groups are at a greater risk of work-related eye injuries given the increased occupational exposure to hazards leading to ocular injuries. Despite health and safety requirements, eye injuries continue to occur in the workplace. Identification of socio-demographic correlates of workplace eye injuries using a population-based sample with state level specific estimates may inform the practice of eye injury prevention in the workplace.

METHODS: Using the 2005-2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a nationwide state-based telephone survey, we analyzed data on 47,294 participants for socio-demographic correlates (age, gender, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, marital status, body mass index, health insurance status and visual impairment) of work-related eye injuries.

RESULTS: The highest lifetime prevalence of workplace eye injury occurred in: males (14.1% 0.4), other non-Hispanic races (11.1% 1.4), married/living with a partner (8.5% 0.3), High school diploma (10.3% 0.5), obese (9.3% 0.5), without eye care insurance (8.4% 0.3), without health insurance (11.5% 0.9), and no visual impairment (8.0% 0.2). State-level estimates of lifetime workplace eye injury were highest in Ohio (9.4% 0.6) and Iowa (9.0% 0.7), and lowest in Louisiana (6.6% 0.8) and Tennessee (6.9%0.5). In a multivariable logistic regression model, males (6.76;[5.82-7.86]) and adults who are widowed, divorced or separated (1.21;[1.05-1.39]) were significantly more likely to report ever incurring a workplace eye injury.

CONCLUSIONS: Targeted interventions in high risk worker groups (such as men) may assist in the prevention of workplace ocular injuries.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Occupational health and safety
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. List three demographic characteristics highly correlated with workplace eye injury. 2. Discuss which top three states report disproportionate rates of workplace eye injury. 3. Describe the relationship between workplace eye injury and health insurance status.

Keywords: Epidemiology, Workplace Safety

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: The presenter conducts research in occupational health and ocular epidemiology. He holds a Master in Public Health (MPH) degree and is board Certified in Public Health (CPH).
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.