218434 Environmental tobacco smoke exposure among Louisiana adults who work in bars and casinos

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Cassandra Contreras, MPH , Campaign for Tobacco Free Living, Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA
Jenna Klink, MPH , Division of Evaluation and Research, Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA
Nikki Lawhorn, MPP , Division of Evaluation and Research, Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA
Lisanne Brown, PhD MPH , Division of Evaluation and Research, Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA
David Lirette, MS, PhD, MT (ASCP) , Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Program, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA
James Diaz Sr., MD, DrPH , Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Program, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA
Chih-Yang Hu, MSPH, ScD , Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Program, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA
F. Avery Ragan Jr., PhD, DABCC , Toxicology Laboratory, Interim Louisiana State University Public Hospital, New Orleans, LA
In January 2007, The Louisiana Smoke Free Air Act went into effect. The Act prevents smoking in all workplaces with the exception of bars and casinos. This study measured the level of secondhand smoke exposure in unprotected Louisiana workplaces by comparing the levels of saliva cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) and nicotine of non-smoking individuals who work in bars and casinos(including musicians) to non-smoking controls who work in smoke-free bars. Study participants were recruited through existing community networks. Individuals who agreed to participate in the study were asked to complete a short survey which collected information on demographics and their tobacco exposure. Participants were given a test kit with two swabs and instructed to give one saliva sample just prior to a greater than four hour shift and another just after the shift. Saliva test kits were returned to researchers in tamper resistant packaging. All study participants who completed the survey and supplied two saliva samples were provided a modest cash incentive. Cotinine and nicotine saliva levels were tested using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry assay. Findings suggest individuals who work in environments where smoking is allowed have elevated saliva cotinine and nicotine levels and are therefore at risk for tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. In some cases their levels are comparable to those of smokers. Increased awareness of the dangers of environmental tobacco exposure in the workplace could provide the evidence and impetus needed to expand smoke-free legislation.

Learning Areas:
Advocacy for health and health education
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Environmental health sciences
Occupational health and safety
Public health or related laws, regulations, standards, or guidelines
Public health or related public policy

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe secondhand smoke exposure among non-smoking adults who work in Louisiana bars and casinos 2. Explain the dangers of environmental tobacco exposure in the workplace 3. Name the key arguments for extending current legislation to protect all Louisiana workers

Keywords: Tobacco Policy, Environmental Exposures

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I've been involved with the planning, recruitment, and data collection for the described study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.