220606 Correlation between social capital and HIV risk factors for young African American males in an urban setting

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 : 12:45 PM - 1:00 PM

Erin Wright, MA , Colorado School of Public Health, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO
Anne Marlow-Geter , STI/HIV Section, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, CO
Sheana Bull, PhD, MPH , Community and Behavioral Health, University of Colorado Denver, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO
Sandra Black, DVM, CSPH , Colorado School of Public Health, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO
Charlene Barrientos Ortiz , Colorado School of Public Health, Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO
Thierry Fortune, MBA , MEE (Motivational Educational Entertainment), Inc., Philadelphia, PA
Ivan Juzang, MBA , MEE Productions Inc., Philadelphia, PA
Background: African Americans disproportionately represent youth with HIV. We must find creative and culturally relevant ways to reach African American youth for HIV prevention research. With increased attention to social capital and its association with health, there is a need for research on how best to integrate social capital into HIV prevention programs. Objective: To investigate whether social capital is associated with HIV risk factors for urban African American males ages 16 20 who participated in a pilot test of a text messaging program about HIV prevention. Methods: We completed correlational analyses of baseline survey data obtained from 60 young Black men aged 16-20 from community settings in Philadelphia PA to participate in a cell phone text messaging program promoting safer sex. Participants were assessed on their STI risk behaviors and level of social capital based on validated measures and our own findings from formative focus groups. Results: We found that social capital was positively associated both with favorable condom peer norms (perception of peers' attitudes towards condom use) and favorable condom norms (personal attitudes towards condom use). Analyses of social capital sub-domains provided both positive and negative correlations with HIV risk factors. Conclusions: These findings are compelling and provide evidence that investigation into effects of social capital on HIV and adolescent sexual risk is warranted and may lead to improved understandings of how to better integrate social capital into future STI and HIV prevention interventions.

Learning Areas:
Diversity and culture
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences
Systems thinking models (conceptual and theoretical models), applications related to public health

Learning Objectives:
1)Describe social capital and how it is associated with health. 2)Evaluate the correlations between social capital and HIV risk behaviors for African American youth in an urban setting. 3)Specify strategies for how social capital can be integrated into HIV prevention programs.

Keywords: Behavioral Research, African American

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I coordinate research projects focusing sexual health education and HIV/STI prevention.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.