220628 How prepared R U? Head Start parents prepare for natural disasters

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Kathryn von Stein, BS , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Education, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Cindy Giron, BS , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Education, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Hoa Nguyen, BA , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Education, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Shiree Ocker, BA , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Education, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Kelechi Nwede, BS , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Education, Loma Linda University, Loma Linds, CA
Patti Herring, PhD, RN , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Elizabeth Holzhauser, MPH , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Susanne Montgomery, PhD , School of Public Health, Dept. Health Promotion & Ed, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA
Natural disasters are part of life, especially in Southern California where earthquakes, mudslides and fires are regular occurrences. While we live with this knowledge and are often encouraged to be prepared many of us are not, and for people who are poor and language isolated, such preparedness is even less likely. To address such preparedness challenges a group of MPH students worked with low income parents and teachers of a Southern CA Head Start program located on several earthquake fault lines and surrounded by dense vegetation of the arid Southern CA climate resulting in regular fire and subsequent mud-slide danger. To inform program development, students conducted a targeted needs and assets assessment (NA+A) with parents, teachers, administrators, and community members. Data were collected through windshield surveys, literature reviews, site observations, theory-based semi-structured interviews, and a confirmatory focus group. Data were coded, themed and analyzed using Grounded Theory methods. Results indicate that participants lacked preparedness knowledge and encountered many barriers to preparedness such as lack of financial resources, time, life stresses, and inadequate realistic plans with respect to reacting during such disasters. Participants requested a hands-on-training that included first aid and CPR training, and tips that would help them prepare an effective but low cost survival kit. NA+A results were used to develop, implement and evaluate a pilot program using process and impact. Program activities and written materials were conducted/prepared in English and Spanish Results of the NA+A process and pilot study will be discussed in light of program sustainability.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Diversity and culture
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related education

Learning Objectives:
By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Identify three ways of helping parents/guardians & school staff to become better prepared for a major disaster. 2. Identify three unique barriers that can be overcome in preparing schools and communities to meet a major disaster proactively. 3. Describe how they might apply the programsí lessons learned to their individual communities relevant to their geographical areas disaster threats.

Keywords: Head Start, Children's Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified because I am a MPH graduate students with many hours of public health experience.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.