223830 Heat vulnerability mapping using satellite imagery, census data and mortality data: Case study in Wayne County, Michigan

Wednesday, November 10, 2010 : 9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Jalonne L. White-Newsome, BS, MS, PhD , Climate and Energy, Union of Concerned Scientists, Washington, DC
Marie S. O'Neill, PhD , School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Shannon J. Brines, MEng , School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Evan Oswald , School of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arobr, MI
Carina Gronlund, MPH , Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI
Daniel G. Brown, PhD , School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Richard Rood , School of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arobr, MI
Kai Zhang , School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arobr, MI
The number of heat waves has increased since the 1950s and these heat waves have been associated with marked short term increases in mortality. Adaptation to heat waves is necessary as future scenarios of heat-related morbidity and mortality become a major public health concern. Measures such as Heat Health Warning Systems (HHWS) are used in some regions to initiate public health interventions in response to weather forecasts that predict heat-wave-like events with potential adverse health impacts. While these systems are a useful tool on a city or regional scale, spatial modeling of smaller-geographic scale (i.e. census tract) risk is important and can be accomplished with geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing products. The purpose of this study is to characterize predictors of the risk of heat-related deaths within the Detroit Metropolitan area at the census tract level. We will determine which data sources, such as urban imperviousness, remotely sensed thermal radiation, socio-demographic factors, and multiple temperature data sources including airport data, and a neighborhood home-based network of temperature data measures (both indoor and outdoor temperatures) - are associated with heat-related mortality risk in specific census tracts. This session will explain and demonstrate how to use GIS with multiple data sources to create a risk-characterization tool that can be used to identify areas that should be prioritized for adaptation strategies to reduce the impact of heat waves.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs

Learning Objectives:
Explain and demonstrate how to use GIS with multiple data sources to create a risk-characterization tool that can be used to identify areas that should be prioritized for adaptation strategies to reduce the impact of heat waves.

Keywords: Geographic Information Systems, Climate Change

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I conducted the data analysis for the project and the topic is apart of my dissertation research that I have been working on for 3 years.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

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