226641 Clearing the air around schools: A GIS study of new FDA tobacco advertising restrictions

Monday, November 8, 2010 : 5:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Douglas A. Luke, PhD , Center for Tobacco Policy Research, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO
Carson Smith , Center for Tobacco Policy Research, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO
Amy A. Sorg, MPH , Center for Tobacco Policy Research, Washington University in St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO
Kurt Ribisl, PhD , Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Matt Eggers , Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
In June, 2009, Congress approved and President Obama signed the Family Smoking and Prevention Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA). This legislation has a number of provisions that have the potential to substantially affect tobacco retailers. One component of the FSPTCA is a restriction of visible tobacco advertising within 1,000 feet of schools and public playgrounds. The tobacco industry has challenged this element of FSPTCA on First Amendment grounds. The Center for Tobacco Policy Research and University of North Carolina are directing a GIS study of the impact of the proposed 1,000 foot rule on advertising in urban and rural communities. Using data from the census, state agencies and the Environmental Systems Research Institute, we constructed 1,000 foot perimeters or equivalents for every public and private elementary and secondary school as well as public parks in the states of Missouri and New York. We geocoded tobacco retailers in these two states and determined how many retailers are within these perimeters. Preliminary results suggest that even in urban areas, the FDA outdoor advertising restriction will not result in the near elimination of tobacco advertising as the industry has claimed. This study will provide accurate data to the Department of Health and Human Services and guidance to states and communities. Challenges identified during this process include obtaining quality data sets and determining the exact perimeters around schools and playgrounds. Other researchers can use the information presented to understand the strengths and challenges associated with using GIS as a tool for assessing community health policy.

Learning Areas:
Public health or related public policy

Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will understand the strengths and challenges associated with using GIS as a tool for assessing community health policy. 2. Participants will be able to describe the steps necessary to examine the FDA advertising banís effect in their own communities.

Keywords: Tobacco Policy, Geographic Information Systems

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Dr. Luke is a Professor at George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis and Director of the Center for Tobacco Policy Research. Dr. Luke is a leading researcher in the areas of health behavior, organizational and systems science, health policy, and tobacco control. He also is a top biostatistician and social science methodologist who has made significant contributions to the evaluation of public health programs, tobacco control and prevention policy, and the application of new methods to community health interventions.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.