227517 Factors associated with men's disclosure of an HPV test result to their main partner

Monday, November 8, 2010

Erica Hesch Anstey, MA, CLC , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Stephanie L. Marhefka, PhD , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Ellen Daley, PhD, MPH , Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Stephanie K. Kolar, MSPH , Community and Family Health, University of South Florida College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Eric R. Buhi, MPH, PhD, CHES , Community and Family Health, University of South Florida College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Judith Ebbert-Syfrett, MPH, RN , Community and Family Health, University of South Florida, College of Public Health, Tampa, FL
Background: Despite the high prevalence of HPV, men typically have not played a role in HPV education/prevention. Little is known about men's disclosure of HPV test results to sexual partners. Purpose: Determine factors associated with men's disclosure of HPV test results to sexual partners. Methods: Men in a psychosocial study of responses to HPV testing who reported having a main sex partner (N=272) completed surveys including questions about: HPV test results; disclosure of HPV test results to partner(s); and knowledge, efficacy, and perceived threat regarding HPV. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted in SAS (reporting odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals) to determine factors associated with disclosure of HPV test results. Results: Most men disclosed their test results to their main partner (n=224, 82%). Neither knowledge nor perceived threat was associated with disclosure. Greater self-efficacy; however, was associated with disclosure (crude OR=1.22, 95%CI: 1.13-1.32). Self-efficacy remained significant in the multivariable logistic regression model (OR=1.22, 95%CI: 1.13-1.32). The following self-efficacy questions were individually associated with disclosure: I feel I can tell my partner my result, I feel I can suggest my partner get a Pap test, I feel I can ask my partner if she has gotten a Pap test, and I feel I can get tested for STIs. Conclusion: Most men disclosed their test results; those who disclosed had higher self-efficacy scores for discussing HPV-related issues with their partner. Interventions that focus on improving men's self-efficacy for discussing STI-related topics with partners may bolster STI prevention efforts.

Learning Areas:
Protection of the public in relation to communicable diseases including prevention or control
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1. To determine whether men disclose their HPV test results to their main sex partners. 2. To examine the factors associated with mens disclosure of an HPV test result to their main sexual partner. 3. To discuss mens role in both primary and secondary preventive HPV behaviors.

Keywords: Reproductive Health, STD

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a doctoral student and graduate research assistant who has worked on this study in various capacities for the last 4 years.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

Back to: 3274.0: Male Involvement