228597 Rules about smoking in Cambodian American households

Monday, November 8, 2010

Robert Friis, PhD , Department of Health Science, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Mohammed Forouzesh, PhD, MPH , Department of Health Science, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Alan Safer, PhD , Department of Mathematics and Statistics, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Che Wankie, MPH , Department of Health Science, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Claire Garrido-Ortega, MPH , Department of Health Science, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Dexter Dizon, BS , Department of Health Science, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA
Kirsten Trefflich, MPA , Cambodian Association of America, Long Beach, CA
Kimthai Kuoch, MPA , Cambodian Association of America, Long Beach, CA
Exposure to secondhand smoke is linked to adverse health outcomes among nonsmokers. We investigated whether Cambodian American households in Long Beach, California have rules that regulate smoking inside their homes. Cambodian American men have a high prevalence of smoking. A stratified random sample of respondents (n = 1014; females = 60.3%; mean age = 49.7 years) was obtained from census tracts with high concentrations of Cambodian Americans. Interview data were collected on demographic characteristics and household smoking rules. A total of 24.6% of respondents stated they had such rules. Significant demographic predictors for having smoking rules inside the home were smoking status, age, marital status, place of birth, employment status, and health status. Household rules about smoking inside the home were associated with: age 18 to 44 years (Relative Risk [RR] = 5.9, 95% CI = 2.6 13.2); age 45 to 64 years (RR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2 3.7); non-married status (RR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.6 3.3); birthplace in the U.S. (RR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.6 4.6); being employed (RR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.2 4.0); and fair or poor health (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.8 2.7). The RR for former smokers versus never smokers was 0.3 (95% CI = 0.1 0.8). We concluded that persons with rules about smoking inside their homes tended to be never smokers, younger than 64 years, non-married, U.S.-born, employed, and have fair or poor health.

Learning Areas:
Public health or related education
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify socio-cultural factors associated with secondhand smoke. 2. Describe the extent to which smoking is allowed inside Cambodian American homes. 3. Describe health effects of exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke.

Keywords: Health Behavior, Tobacco Control

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have a Ph.D. degree and am a researcher/faculty member. I have written articles on this topic and participated in prior programs.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.