228695 Predictors of knowledge of community accessibility for people with mobility disabilities

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 : 5:24 PM - 5:42 PM

Edward Wang, PhD , Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
James Rimmer, PhD , Occupational Therapy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
Yochai Eisenberg, MUPP , Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Vijay Vasudevan, MPH , Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
As part of a 5-year NIH grant on Obesity and the Built Environment, the purposes of this study were to (a) assess level of knowledge on community accessibility among people with mobility disabilities, and (b) examine factors associated with a higher level of community accessibility knowledge. 84 individuals with mobility disabilities living in a large urban area were surveyed on knowledge of community accessibility regarding five domains: exercise, nutrition, transportation, sidewalks, and facility accessibility. The majority of subjects were female (59%), African American (77%), high school graduate (75%), not employed (87%), reported annual income less than $15,000 (80%) with a mean age of 52.1ħ14.7 (yr) and a mean BMI of 38.2ħ19.0 (kg/m2). The overall knowledge of community accessibility was low, 61.3 (out of 100), with the highest score on sidewalks (71.6) and exercise (70.4) followed by transportation (65.0), nutrition (56.1), and facility accessibility (43.4). Education, income, and race were all predictive of knowledge of community accessibility, with college graduate, higher income group (>$15,000), and White displaying higher knowledge scores on all five domains. Younger age was also significantly associated with higher knowledge on exercise (r=-.31, p=.005). Lower BMI (r=-.40, p=.002) and younger age (r=-.43, p<.001) were also predictive of higher knowledge on transportation. In a multivariate model, however, only education (p=.0023) was found to be a significant predictor of knowledge on community accessibility. The palpable lack of knowledge on community accessibility shows a critical need to focus more on education in interventions that seek to empower individuals with mobility disabilities.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related public policy

Learning Objectives:
1. Evaluate the importance of knowledge of community accessibility for people with mobility disabilities 2. Identify the factors associated with having more knowledge of community accessibility, physical activity and nutrition

Keywords: Community Participation, Disability

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a PhD faculty with expertise on disability and community accessibility research
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.