228889 Physical Activity Reduces Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-infected Individuals

Wednesday, November 10, 2010 : 12:30 PM - 12:45 PM

Gregory A. Hand, PhD MPH , Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Jason R. Jaggers, MS , Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Wesley D. Dudgeon, PhD, CSCS , Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Science, The Citadel, Charleston, SC
Stephanie Burgess, PhD , College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
J. Larry Durstine, PhD , Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
G. William Lyerly, MS, PhD , College of Natural and Applied Sciences, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC
Kenneth D. Phillips, PhD, RN , College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN
People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have a 70-80% higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the risk may increase with age. Two major risk factors that are increased are low aerobic capacity (maximal VO2) and increased serum triglyceride levels. Purpose: To test the effect of moderate intensity physical activity on aerobic capacity and serum triglyceride levels in HIV-infected adult men and women. Methods: 114 individuals were randomized to a physical activity group (PA) or non-exercise control group (CON). PA participated in a 6-week program consisting of two weekly 30 minute bouts of moderate intensity physical activity and 30 minute bouts of resistance training. CON attended the research center for the equivalent amount of time and were allowed to read or watch television. A graded exercise stress test and blood analysis was performed before and after the physical activity program for each participant. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare variables within groups, with between group analysis using ANOVA/Tukey post-hoc analysis. Results: Baseline aerobic capacity across groups was approximately 25% below age and gender predicted levels. PA participants showed a 21% increase in aerobic capacity. Baseline blood analysis placed the average triglyceride level in the borderline high range. PA showed a significant reduction in triglyceride level (15570 to 11030 mg/dl) with no change in the CON participants. Conclusion: These results indicate that moderate intensity physical activity increases aerobic capacity and reduces serum triglyceride levels. The findings suggest that physical activity can significantly affect important risk factors for cardiovascular disease in PLWHA.

Learning Areas:
Basic medical science applied in public health
Chronic disease management and prevention
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Public health biology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify two significant cardiovascular risk factors in people living with HIV. 2. Describe the effect of physical activity on aerobic capacity and blood triglyceride levels in people living with HIV.

Keywords: HIV Interventions, Physical Activity

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: This work was performed by my research group, and I am an expert in physical activity research in HIV-infected individuals.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.