229397 Factors Associated with Early Postpartum Depression Among Black and Latino Mothers

Monday, November 8, 2010 : 9:35 AM - 9:50 AM

Elizabeth Howell, MD, MPP , Department of Health Evidence and Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Amy N. Balbierz, BA, MPH , Department of Health Evidence and Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Jason Wang, PhD , Department of Health Evidence and Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Howard Leventhal, PhD , Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ
Depression among postpartum women of color is understudied. As part of a randomized controlled trial, 460 self-identified Black and Latino postpartum mothers were interviewed during their postpartum hospital stay to assess depression (using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale), anxiety, and other factors. The associations of early postpartum depression with race/ethnicity, other demographic characteristics, and clinical factors were examined using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Mean age was 28; 66% of the sample were Latino and 34% were Black. Thirty-six percent were foreign born, 21% spoke Spanish, and 62% had Medicaid insurance. Fifteen percent screened positive for depression (EPDS score >10) and there were no racial/ethnic differences in rates of depression. Depression was more common in mothers born in the US than mothers born outside of the US (10% vs. 18%, p=.01), English-speakers than Spanish-speakers (17% vs. 8%), p=.02), single mothers than married mothers (19% vs. 13%, p=.056), and mothers with a past history of depression than mothers without a past history of depression (47% vs. 9%, p<.0001). After adjusting for race, other demographic factors, past history of depression, delivery type, comorbid illness, and complication status, depression was more common in mothers with a past history of depression (OR of 8.21, 95% CI: 4.47, 15.08). Racial/ethnic differences in rates of early postpartum depression did not exist among Black and Latino mothers. Further research is needed to assess the impact of early depression screening on the mental health outcomes of high risk women, particularly in Black and Latino communities.

Learning Areas:
Diversity and culture
Epidemiology
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
To assess the relationship between race, demographic factors, and clinical factors with early reported postpartum depression among Black and Latino mothers.

Keywords: Depression, Maternal Health

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualitfied to present because I am the primary author of the abstract and am the primary investigator for this study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.