230374 Knowledge, attitude and prostate cancer screening experience among African American men in Southside Chicago: An intervention strategy for risk reduction activity

Wednesday, November 10, 2010 : 8:30 AM - 8:48 AM

P. Bassey Williams, PhD, CHES , Department of Health Studies, College of Health Sciences, Chicago State University, Chicago, IL
Anthony M. Sallar, PhD; MPH; MBA , School of Public Health Sciences and Professions, Ohio University, Athens, OH
Emmanuel Osunkoya, MD, MPH , College of Health Sciences, Chicago State University, Chicago, IL
Background: Prostate cancer remains the most common non-cutaneous malignancy among men in the United States and the leading cause of death among African American men. Compared to whites and other major ethnic groups African American men have over seven-fold increased risk of developing and dying from prostate cancer. This study assessed knowledge levels of prostate cancer, attitude and prostate cancer screening experiences among African men in Southside neighborhoods of Chicago.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional random sampling of 500 African American males aged 40 to 70 years, using a 30-item questionnaire. We collected demographic information, health insurance status, knowledge of the prostate cancer, symptoms and risk factors of the disease, benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), sources of information, individual attitudes towards prostate cancer screening and utilization of prostate cancer screening experiences among the subjects. The questionnaire was via person-to-person interview method.

Results: Of the 500 respondents utilized for the study, percent age distribution was as follows: 35 44 (40%); 45-54 (32%); 55 64 (15%); 65 74 (13%). Overall level of knowledge varied with age. Statistically significant differences were observed between the age groups on awareness and knowledge of BPH and prostate cancer (p< 0.001), specific risk factors of prostate cancer (p < 0.001), prostate cancer screening history (p < 0.001), individual attitudes towards prostate cancer screening experience (p < 0.001), and utilization of prostate cancer screening experiences among the subjects (p = 0.033).

Conclusion: There is need to improve knowledge of prostate cancer, risk reduction activities, and appropriate prostate cancer response. Family and African American faith-based communities should be utilized to deliver prostate cancer and other health information.

Key words: Prostate cancer screening, benign prostatic hypertrophy, African American men, risk- Reduction activities.

Learning Areas:
Advocacy for health and health education
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1) At the end of the presentation, the audience will be able to discuss the level of knowledge of prostate cancer, attitude and prostate cancer screening experiences among African American men in the Southside neighborhoods of Chicago. 2) At the end of the presentation, the audience will be able to identify which group of subjects were more likely to know the risk factors of prostate cancer and participate in early prostate cancer screening experience.

Keywords: Health Disparities, Cancer Screening

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to give this presentation because I am a public health faculty and specifically teach courses in health promotion and disease prevention at undergraduate and graduate levels.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.