236661 United States-Mexico border Latinas: Breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and early detection practices

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Yelena Bird, MD, PhD, MPH , School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
John Moraros, MD, PhD , School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Matthew P. Banegas, MS, MPH , Department of Health Services, University of Washington; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Surasri Prapasiri, MPH , Department of Health Science, Las Cruces, NM
Beti Thompson, PhD , Public Health Sciences/Cancer Prevention, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
Robert Buckingham, DrPH , School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Xiaolei Tao, MD , School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Introduction: Evidence suggests Latinas residing along the US-Mexico border face higher breast cancer mortality rates compared to Latinas in the interior of either country. The purpose of this study was to investigate breast cancer early detection practices of US-Mexico border Latinas, by assessing the levels of breast cancer knowledge, attitudes and use of preventive screening methods.

Methods: For this binational cross-sectional study, 265 participants completed an interviewer administered questionnaire that obtained information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, family history, and screening practices. Differences between Mexican (n=128) and US Latina (n=137) participants were assessed by Pearson's c2, Fischer's Exact test, t-tests, and multivariate regression analyses.

Results: US Latinas had significantly increased odds of having ever received a mammogram/ breast ultrasound (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.81) and clinical breast exam (OR = 2.98) compared to their Mexican counterparts. Mexican women had a significantly greater proportion of high knowledge levels (54.8%) compared to US Latinas (45.2%; p<0.05). Nationality, age, education, and insurance status were significantly associated with breast cancer screening use.

Conclusion: Despite having higher levels of breast cancer knowledge than US Latinas, Mexican women along the US-Mexico border are not receiving the recommended breast cancer screening procedures. While US border Latinas had higher breast cancer screening levels than their Mexican counterparts, these levels are lower than those seen among the general US Latina population. Our findings underscore the lack of access to breast cancer prevention services and emphasize the need to develop strategies for improving access and participation in breast cancer screening.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Epidemiology
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Occupational health and safety
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Provision of health care to the public

Learning Objectives:
Introduction: Evidence suggests Latinas residing along the US-Mexico border face higher breast cancer mortality rates compared to Latinas in the interior of either country. The purpose of this study was to investigate breast cancer early detection practices of US-Mexico border Latinas, by assessing the levels of breast cancer knowledge, attitudes and use of preventive screening methods. Methods: For this binational cross-sectional study, 265 participants completed an interviewer administered questionnaire that obtained information on socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, family history, and screening practices. Differences between Mexican (n=128) and US Latina (n=137) participants were assessed by Pearson°¶s É”2, Fischer°¶s Exact test, t-tests, and multivariate regression analyses. Results: US Latinas had significantly increased odds of having ever received a mammogram/ breast ultrasound (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.81) and clinical breast exam (OR = 2.98) compared to their Mexican counterparts. Mexican women had a significantly greater proportion of high knowledge levels (54.8%) compared to US Latinas (45.2%; p<0.05). Nationality, age, education, and insurance status were significantly associated with breast cancer screening use. Conclusion: Despite having higher levels of breast cancer knowledge than US Latinas, Mexican women along the US-Mexico border are not receiving the recommended breast cancer screening procedures. While US border Latinas had higher breast cancer screening levels than their Mexican counterparts, these levels are lower than those seen among the general US Latina population. Our findings underscore the lack of access to breast cancer prevention services and emphasize the need to develop strategies for improving access and participation in breast cancer screening. Learning Objectives: 1. Determine breast cancer knowledge, attitudes and early detection practices among Latinas on the United States-Mexico border; and 2. Describe the differences in socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, family history, and screening practices among Mexican and US Latinas.

Keywords: Breast Cancer, Latinas

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a faculty member in the School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan. I designed and conducted this study in the United States-Mexico border Latinas.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.