236777 Association of Age, Race, and Body Mass Index with Sex Steroid Hormone Marker Profiles among Men, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

Monday, October 31, 2011: 1:05 PM

Jamie Ritchey, MPH, PhD , US Army Public Health Command, Behavioral and Social Health Outcomes Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
Wilfried Karmaus , Arnold School of Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Susan E. Steck, PhD , Department of Epidemology and Biostatistics & Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Hongmei Zhang, PhD , Arnold School of Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Tara Sabo-Attwood, PhD , Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, USA;, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Introduction: Different levels of testosterone (T), 17- estradiol (E), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and androstanediol glucuronide (3- diol G) have been proposed to explain racial disparities in rates of several chronic diseases. Investigating these markers individually has resulted in mixed findings across studies stratified by race. Because these markers are metabolically linked, assessing a suite of markers may be superior in providing information on racial disparities. Therefore, we created serum profiles combining these markers and investigated by age, race/ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). Methods: We analyzed demographic, laboratory, hormone and dietary data for 1,538 men, >17 years, from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). To identify hormone marker profiles, we used cluster analysis with Blom-transformed T, E, SHBG, and 3- diol G levels. We applied multinomial logistic regression models to examine whether age, race, and BMI groups were associated differently with the profiles. Results: We identified four sex hormone marker cluster profiles. Mexican American men >50 years were most likely to be associated with the lowest T, E, and 3- diol G levels compared to other profiles (p<0.05). Non-Hispanic Black, overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (>30 kg/m2) men were most likely to be in the cluster with the lowest SHBG (p<0.05). Conclusion: The associations of hormone profile markers by race/ethnicity are novel, while findings by age and BMI groups are largely consistent with single hormone studies. Future studies should examine hormone marker profiles in relation to chronic disease risk rather than single markers.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health biology
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
1. Discuss that a suite of serum hormone markers may be superior in providing information on racial disparities than testosterone, androstanediol glucuronide, 17- estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin used singly in regression models. 2. Explain how k-means cluster analysis can aid in creating hormone profiles from hormone laboratory measurements. 3. Explain how to use hormone profiles in multinomial linear regression models to examine differences by age, race, and body mass index to assess possible health disparities. 4. Discuss which specific age, race, and body mass index groups are associated with particular hormone profiles and how this compares to the literature investigating single hormone models.

Keywords: Biostatistics, Endocrine

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: This is part of my PhD dissertation work
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

See more of: Health Disparities
See more of: Epidemiology