238528 Relationship between physical activity and mental health among Texas adolescents the role of physical education (PE) class attendance

Wednesday, November 2, 2011: 12:50 PM

Alice Fang Yan, MD, PhD , Department of Health and Kinesiology, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX
Mary Thomas, MPH , Communities Putting Prevention to Work, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, TX
Katherine Velasquez, RN , Communities Putting Prevention to Work, City of San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, TX
Gentry Kuehn, MS , Department of Health and Kinesiology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
Sha Ge, MA, PhD , Department of Sports Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, China
Objective: To assess association of physical activity (PA), particularly attending physical education (PE) classes, with feelings of sadness and suicide ideation and behaviors among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white Texas adolescents.

Methods: A sample of 2,741 adolescents (grades 9 through 12) from the 2009 Texas Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was examined. Logistic regression models were used to assess the relation between physical activity for at least 60 minutes per day on five or more of the past seven days, attending PE, and participating in team sports, and the dependent variables, feelings of sadness and considering, planning, and attempting suicide. Statistical analyses were conducted using SAS 9.2 (Cary, NC), which accounts for multistage sampling.

Results: More boys than girls reported being physically active (P<.001), and more girls than boys reported feelings of sadness and considering or planning suicide (P<.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that self-reported physical activity for at least 60 minutes per day on five or more days of the past week was inversely related to feelings of sadness or hopelessness (odds ratio (OR) = 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.35 0.89). Non-Hispanic Whites were more likely to report planning suicide than their Hispanic counterparts. Greater attendance in PE was inversely associated with considering (P = 0.0187) and planning suicide (P = 0.0057).

Conclusions: Findings are consistent with beneficial effects of attending PE on suicidal behaviors in adolescents. Engaging adolescents in more physical activity may be considered as part of an intervention strategy to improve their physical and mental well-being.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Biostatistics, economics
Epidemiology
Public health or related laws, regulations, standards, or guidelines
Public health or related research

Learning Objectives:
Participants in this session will: 1. Describe how theory based analysis is applied. 2. Discuss the relationship between physical activity and mental health among Texas adolescents. 3.gain an understanding of the complexity of the relationships between physical activity and mental health and how attending PE may make positive contribution to the mental health of adolescents..

Keywords: Mental Health, Physical Activity

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am responsible to provide the data source and contributed to the developement of the abstract.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.