238574 HIV testing in a New York City sample of young men who have sex with men

Monday, October 31, 2011

Daniel Siconolfi, MPH , Center for Health, Identity, Behavior & Prevention Studies, New York University, New York, NY
Perry N. Halkitis, PhD , Director, Center for Health, Identity, Behavior, and Prevention Studies, The Steinhardt School, New York University, New York, NY
Robert W. Moeller , Center for Health, Identity, Behavior, and Prevention Studies (CHIBPS), New York University, New York, NY
Staci Barton, BA , Center for Health, Identity, Behavior & Prevention Studies, New York University, New York, NY
Background: New HIV infections continue to increase among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in New York City. HIV testing behaviors were examined with regard to key demographics and substance use in a diverse sample of 13 29 year-old YMSM using cross-sectional survey data. Methods: 558 YMSM completed a quantitative survey at social and educational venues throughout the NYC metropolitan area and were provided a cash incentive. Results: The majority of YMSM had tested (86.9%) for HIV. Men overwhelmingly had tested as part of a regularly scheduled health check-up or test (49.4%), or because they wanted know their status (49.2%). Older men, Black, Latino, and multiracial/other men were more likely to have tested than API or White men, as were men who used poppers in the prior 3 months. Men who lived outside of the New York/Metro area were less likely to have tested; nearly a third had never tested. HIV testing history was not associated with sexual identity, household composition, who raised participants, perceived SES, or other substance use. Multivariate modeling indicated that Black men, adolescents (13-17 years old), popper users, and NYC and NYC metro area residents were more likely to have tested. Conclusions: HIV testing programs should be embedded with a holistic YMSM health framework and draw upon the agency experienced by young men in their testing behaviors. Further, in order to reach all men, efforts must account for racial/ethnic and developmental differences.

Learning Areas:
Provision of health care to the public
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Describe rationales for HIV testing behaviors in a sample of NYC YMSM. Compare HIV testing behaviors by demographic characteristics and substance use.

Keywords: HIV/AIDS, Gay Men

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Not Answered