239849 Secondary Effects on Polydrug Use of a Brief Motivational Interviewing Intervention Designed to Reduce Alcohol Consumption among Freshmen

Wednesday, November 2, 2011: 9:10 AM

Donna M. Kazemi, PhD , Colleg of Health and Human Services,School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
Jacek Dmochowski, PhD , Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
Linman Sun, PhDc , Mathematics and Statistics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
Kathryn Grady, RN, BSN , School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
Mary Nies, PhD, FAAN, FAAHB , School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
Samuel Walford, MA , College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC
Aim: This study investigated the relationship of high-risk drinking and illicit drug use over 6 months for freshmen college students. The secondary effects on illicit drug use from a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) brief motivational interviewing (BMI) intervention was examined.

Methods: The BASICS BMI intervention was implemented at a public university as a 3-year program designed to address underage drinking among freshmen. Participants were 299 volunteer freshmen from a state-supported University. Participants attended an initial baseline visit, then 2-week, 3-month, 6-month post baseline visits.

Analysis: Descriptive statistics and graphs were used to summarize study variables. Paired t-tests were used to determine differences between alcohol consumption at different time points. McNemar's test was used to compare correlated proportions (drug and marijuana).

Results: At the baseline 30% of the participants were drinking and using illicit drugs, compared with 25% at the 6-month visit. Alcohol use was associated with illicit drug use heavier drinkers have a greater probability of using illicit drug. The findings show a decrease in alcohol consumption will also decrease the probability of drug use. The study provides an empirical foundation for the development of college health interventions aimed at prevention of alcohol and drug use. These findings provide insights for health professionals practice and research related to promoting health of college students. The results of this study can potentially change the way college campuses, student health centers, and acute and community health professional work to address alcohol and illicit drug abuse in young adults.

Learning Areas:
Diversity and culture
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Other professions or practice related to public health
Public health or related nursing
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Describe the current morbidity/mortality and negative consequences associated with college studentís alcohol and other drug use. Describe the secondary effect of Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) brief motivational interviewing (BMI) intervention on illicit drug use. Describe the research study findings applicability to health professionals practice to promote college students health.

Keywords: College Students, Substance Abuse Treatment

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I am the director of the BSCR BASICS treatment program to prevent underage drinking and illicit drug use among freshmen at the University of North Carolina Charlotte. I am chair of the BSCR BASICS research team and PI of the current research study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.