239989 Participant satisfaction with remote self-monitoring technology for chronic disease prevention

Tuesday, November 1, 2011: 5:06 PM

Sheree Shapiro, MSc , Aging, Rehabilitation, and Geriatric Care Research Centre, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada
Melanie Stuckey, PhD(c) , School of Kinesiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
Kristin Sabourin, MSc (c) , School of Kinesiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
Claudio Munoz, MD, PhD , Gateway Rural Health Research Institute, Gateway Rural Health Research Institute, Seaforth, ON, Canada
Robert Petrella, MD, PhD , Aging, Rehabilitation, and Geriatric Care Research Centre, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON, Canada
Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to determine the satisfaction level with remote self-monitoring technologies among patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods: Participants (n = 15, mean age = 56.5) in rural southwestern Ontario attended four visits over the course of a year (0, 12, 24, and 52 weeks), and were provided with a Blackberry (BB), Bluetooth blood pressure (BP) monitor, Bluetooth glucometer, and pedometer to self-monitor their health. All measures were sent automatically to an online database, monitored by the research team. Using a self-report questionnaire, participants described their experiences with the technology. Results: Comfort using the devices varied, with 78.6% being immediately comfortable with the BP monitor, 57.1% with the glucometer, 100% with the pedometer, and 40% with the BB. For all devices, the remaining participants were comfortable with their use by two weeks into the study. Using a likert scale from 1-5 (strongly disagree - strongly agree) participants noted that the technology motivated them to exercise (mean = 4.0 1.6), increased personal self awareness (mean = 4.5 0.8), made them feel secure (mean = 4.1 1.1), was not time consuming (mean=2.1 1.3), and did not lose its novelty (mean = 2.1 1.0). As a result of the study, 26.7% planned on purchasing a BP monitor, 25.0% a glucometer, 50% a pedometer, 0.0% a BB, and 83.3% a self-monitoring health program. Conclusion: Based on the results, remote self-monitoring appears to provide a satisfactory means for patients that may decrease the burden of chronic disease.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Chronic disease management and prevention
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe satisfaction level with remote monitoring technology in older adults 2. Assess the feasibility of remote monitoring technology for chronic disease management in rural areas

Keywords: Aging, Chronic Diseases

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am the Principal Investigator of the study.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.