240283 Impact of school experiences and school contextual factors on substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors among African-American female college students

Monday, October 31, 2011: 11:18 AM

Jiangmin Xu, PhD , School of Health Sciences, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC
College students, especially African American Female college students, are among the highest risk groups and are more likely to be at risk for contracting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) due to their substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors (CDC, 2008). Previous studies and educational interventions have focused on female college students' knowledge of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and STDs, but failed to examine the impacts of school experiences and contextual factors. In fact, the college environment offers many opportunities for those high-risk behaviors, including unsafe sex, multiple sexual partners, and substance abuse.

Analyses were based on data gathered from 267 African-American female college students enrolled at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) who participated in the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey. The purposes of this study are twofold: first, to identify the impact of HIV and STDs knowledge on substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors among African-American female college students; and second, to assess the impact of school experiences and school contextual factors on their substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors. The findings indicate that the HIV and STD knowledge have no significant effects on female college students' substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors; instead, students' experiences and school contextual factors are two important factors in predicting substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors. The research findings demonstrated that students' experiences and school contextual factors are important factors associated with HIV/STD and health promotion prevention among African-American female college students.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Public health or related organizational policy, standards, or other guidelines
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1.Identify the impact of HIV and STDs knowledge on substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors among African-American female college students. 2.Assess the impact of school experiences and school contextual factors on female college studentsí substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors. 3.Assess the importance of female college studentsí experiences and school contextual factors in health promotion and HIV/STD prevention.

Keywords: College Students, Sexual Risk Behavior

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I worked with the student health service of Winston-Salem State University to collect and analyze the data. The research results and relevant data about health of African-American college students will enhance college studentsí health promotion and provide prevention service to college students with specific risks and needs.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.