242402 Intimate partner violence among dual-earner blue-collar couples: Role of job stress, drinking, & normative beliefs about aggression

Wednesday, November 2, 2011: 10:50 AM

Carol B. Cunradi, MPH, PhD , Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Berkeley, CA
Genevieve M. Ames, PhD , Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Berkeley, CA
Michael Duke , Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research & Evaluation, Berkeley, CA
Elevated risk for intimate partner violence (IPV) is linked with work-related stress factors (e.g., unemployment; job strain), but few studies account for each partner's job stress, drinking, normative beliefs about aggression, and personal background characteristics (e.g., impulsivity; childhood maltreatment) in relation to likelihood of IPV among the couple. The objective of this study is to analyze the interrelationship of these factors to risk for male-to-female and female-to-male partner violence among a sample of dual-earner, blue-collar couples. In cooperation with a large construction union in Northern California, confidential data were obtained via telephone interview from 1,088 workers (53% response rate) and 927 of their spouses/cohabiting partners who voluntarily participated in a cross-sectional health behavior survey. The current sample (n=502 dual-earner couples) consists of male construction workers and their employed female partners. IPV was measured with the physical assault subscale of the CTS2. Path models with binary dependent variables and continuous mediating and moderating variables were specified. Based on both partner's reports, prevalence of male-to-female and female-to-male partner violence was 20% and 25%, respectively. For both partners, impulsivity and normative beliefs about aggression were positively related to IPV. For males, job strain and frequency of intoxication also mediated the association between impulsivity and male-to female partner violence. For females, childhood maltreatment was directly associated with male-to female partner violence. The results suggest that interventions that address the role of each partner's impulsivity and normative beliefs about aggression, and the male's job strain and drinking, may help prevent IPV among dual-earner blue-collar couples.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Occupational health and safety
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
At the conclusion of the session, the participant in this session will be able to: 1. Describe the importance of analyzing each partnerís job stress, drinking, normative beliefs about aggression, and background factors in relation to risk for intimate partner violence (IPV) among dual-earner blue-collar couples. 2. Evaluate findings that show gender differences in direct and mediated pathways to IPV from normative beliefs about aggression, impulsivity, childhood maltreatment and job strain for dual-earner blue-collar couples. 3. Discuss the need for IPV interventions among dual-earner blue-collar couples that address the role of each partnerís impulsivity and normative beliefs about aggression, and the maleís job strain and drinking.

Keywords: Domestic Violence, Workplace Stressors

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I am an expert on intimate partner violence, substance use, and environmental factors.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

See more of: Epidemiology of violence
See more of: Epidemiology