242582 HIV testing among Deep South residents 50-64 years old with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes

Monday, October 31, 2011: 5:30 PM

Lisa Wigfall, PhD, MA, BSMT (ASCP) , Institute for Partnerships to Eliminate Health Disparities, University of South Carolina - Arnold School of Public Health (Department of Health Services Policy and Management), Columbia, SC
Edith M. Williams, PhD, MS , Institute for Partnerships to Eliminate Health Disparities, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Neethu Sebastian , Institute for Partnerships to Eliminate Health Disparities, University of South Carolina - Arnold School of Public Health (Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior), Columbia, SC
Saundra H. Glover, PhD, MBA , Director, Instittute for Partnerships to Eliminate Health Disparities, University of South Carolina-Arnold School of Public Health (Department of Health Services Policy and Management), Columbia, SC
Background: In the United States in 2007, the proportion of adults aged 50 years and older whose time to an AIDS diagnosis after a diagnosis of HIV infection was less than a year ranged from 39-48% and increased with age. The proposed research study describes the uptake of HIV testing among Deep South residents 50-64 years old with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes. Methods: Deep South residents from Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina who completed the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey were sampled. Associations between chronic health conditions (CVD, diabetes) and HIV testing were examined. Results: About 30% of the sample (n=1,017) reported that they had been tested for HIV. The mean age of persons tested for HIV (56.630.20SE) was significantly lower than that of those who had never been tested for HIV (57.600.12SE) (p <.0001). Persons with CVD or diabetes were 22% less likely to report that they had been tested for HIV, compared to those with both CVD and diabetes (OR= 0.776, 95% CI, 0.611-0.985). Conclusions: The HIV serostatus of persons 50- 64 years old should be ascertained if it is unknown, regardless of perceived risk for HIV/AIDS. Linking HIV testing with routine health visits may present an opportunity for earlier diagnosis of HIV infection among older adults with CVD and/or diabetes. Making the most of these opportunities becomes increasingly important among older adults who are at a greater risk of being diagnosed with HIV infection late in the disease process.

Learning Areas:
Epidemiology
Public health or related public policy
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
1. Describe prevalence of HIV testing among persons aged 50 years and older. 2. Compare mean age of persons 50 years and older who have been tested for HIV to those who have not been tested for HIV. 2. Discuss uptake of HIV testing among persons aged 50 years and older with other chronic conditions (i.e., cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes).

Keywords: HIV/AIDS, Chronic Diseases

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present this work because I have experience conducting secondary data analysis using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.

See more of: HIV/AIDS in Aging Populations
See more of: HIV/AIDS