243009 Shop Talk: Lay-health barbers offer health advice with style

Monday, October 31, 2011

Lisa Hoffman Falconer, MPH, CHES , Prevention Research Center, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA
Catherine Haywood, BSW , Prevention Research Center, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA
Keelia O'Malley, MPH , Prevention Research Center, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA
Laura Dean, MPH , Dietetic Intern/Prevention Research Center, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA
Carolyn C. Johnson, PhD , Community Health Sciences, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA
Donald (Diego) Rose, PhD, MPH , Tulane University School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA
Shop Talk was a pilot health promotion campaign that focused on engagement of barbers to serve as lay-health advisors to counsel their peers on important health issues. In the African-American community, barbershops have long been considered comfortable settings for personal conversations. The goal of Shop Talk was to employ barbers as lay-health advisors to positively change patron's attitudes about diet, physical activity and other health behaviors with a culturally-competent information campaign. The intervention included lay-health advisor training to barbers and distribution of the Feel Good Guide developed with barbers' input containing information on key health issues and other resources. To evaluate the implementation process, qualitative interviews were conducted post-intervention with barbers (n=21). All 21 participants responded positively when asked about the program and Feel Good Guide. Many suggestions for improvement were made, including the size of the book, the depth of the information and the selection of recipes. Ninety percent of participants reported they liked the lay-health advisor training. Most barbers reported they allowed their customers to initiate a conversation about health with the help of the Feel Good Guide. The most popular topics discussed were healthy eating, diabetes maintenance, blood pressure, physical activity and sexual health. All barbers expressed that their customers were making lifestyle changes as a result of the program. Data from this pilot study indicates the Shop Talk program is feasible and successful relative to implementation and participation. The lay-health advisor model employed by this program could be easily applied to other community-based settings.

Learning Areas:
Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Public health or related education

Learning Objectives:
1.Session participants will be able to outline the process of starting a community-health worker program in barbershops, beauty salons or churches and what support and resources such a program needs in order to be successful. 2.Session participants will be able to effectively design health promotion materials for dissemination to community-health workers in a barbershop/beauty salon setting based on qualitative feedback from the Shop Talk participants.

Keywords: Community-Based Health Promotion, African American

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am a CHES who manages community-based health promotion programs, in particular the Shop Talk program highlighted in this abstract.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.