243949 Prevalence and Correlates of Pregnancy Desire Among Adolescent African-American Females

Monday, October 31, 2011

Jessica M. Sales, PhD , Rollins School of Public Health Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Jennifer L. Brown, PhD , Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA
Teaniese P. Latham, MPH , Rollins School of Public Health Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Ralph J. DiClemente, PhD , Rollins School of Public Health and Center for AIDS Research, Emory Univeristy, Atlanta, GA
Andrea Swartzendruber, MPH , Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Eve S. Rose, MSPH , Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Behavioral Science and Health Education, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
Background: Most adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, however, some are intentional. Prior research has shown that intention to become pregnant is associated with pregnancy among teens, but few studies have explored the correlates of pregnancy intention in this population. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of wanting to become pregnant among a sample of African-American adolescent females. Methods: 410 unmarried African-American adolescent females (15-22 years) completed an ACASI as part of an STD prevention program. Demographic, psychosocial, abuse history, relational, and sexual behaviors were assessed. Bivariate and multivariate regressions were conducted to explore correlates of intention to become pregnant. Results: Forty-five participants (11%) reported trying to become pregnant in the past 6 months. In bivariate analyses, those trying to become pregnant were more likely to have experienced emotional and sexual abuse by boyfriend (past 90 days), have a boyfriend who had sex with another woman while they were dating, and have greater desire to please their boyfriend than those not intending to get pregnant. In logistic models, only sexual abuse by boyfriend (AOR = 10.97, p = .03) and greater desire to please their partner (AOR = 1.99, p =.008) remained significantly associated with intention to become pregnant. Conclusion: Our findings suggest relationship characteristics are key factors associated with pregnancy intention among unmarried African-American adolescent females. Given that early childbearing poses significant economic, social, and physical health problems for mothers and children, pregnancy prevention programs that address pregnancy intentions among adolescents are needed.

Learning Areas:
Public health or related research
Social and behavioral sciences

Learning Objectives:
Identify the prevalence of pregnancy intention among African-American adolescent females Identify correlates of pregnancy intention among African-American adolescent females Discuss how correlates of pregnancy intention can inform the design of pregnancy prevention programs for African-American adolescent females

Keywords: Adolescents, Reproductive Planning

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: Research assistant professor in the Rollins School of Public Health, Behavioral Sciences and Health Education
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.