244068 Policy Implications of Addressing Young Adolescents with an Integrated Nutrition, Hygiene and Reproductive Health Intervention: Evidence from Rural Uttar Pradesh

Monday, October 31, 2011

Nandita Kapadia-Kundu, PhD , Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, Baltimore, MD
Geetali Trivedi, MA , Urban Health Initiative, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School/Center for Communication Programs, Lucknow, India
Ajay Misra, Phd , Futures Group Inernational, Lucknow, India
Meenakshi Dixit, MA , Itap, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School, Center for Communication Programs, Lucknow, India
Kimberly Rook , Center for Communication Programs, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Basil A. Safi, MPH, PE, CHES , Center for Communication Programs, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Objective: To demonstrate the need for integrated interventions for young adolescents in rural Uttar Pradesh for long term health benefits in maternal and infant health. Background Uttar Pradesh (UP) has a high maternal mortality ratio and infant mortality rate. More than half (59 percent) of women aged 20-24 years marry before 18 years (NFHS-3). UP is home to 17.2 million adolescent girls. Nutrition and RH programs for in-school adolescents are vertical. Methods The data are part of a baseline assessment for a randomized cluster trial in 30 rural schools in Hardoi district, UP. Baseline data were collected in 2010 from 1195 girls (grades 6-8). Results The nutritional status of the girls is poor. The rate of stunting (< median-2 sd) increased with each year, with 49.4 percent 15 year old girls being stunted compared to 25.8 percent girls at 11 yrs. About 48 percent girls reported they had not consumed any protein rich food a day prior to the survey and only 2.7 percent had consumed green leafy vegetables. Menstrual problems were reported by 63 percent of the girls and 6.5 percent reported symptoms of reproductive tract infections; 71 percent learnt about menstruation after their menses had begun. Handwashing with soap: after defecation 70 percent, before eating 13.9 percent, before cooking - 5 percent. Conclusions There is a need to simultaneously improve nutrition, hygiene and reproductive health behaviors in young adolescents. Starting with young adolescents is a first step to building healthy communities in Uttar Pradesh.

Learning Areas:
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs
Program planning
Public health or related organizational policy, standards, or other guidelines
Public health or related public policy

Learning Objectives:
1.To demonstrate the need for integrated interventions for young adolescents in rural Uttar Pradesh for long term health benefits in maternal and infant health. 2.To identify the need to start with young adolescents as a step towards building healthy communities in Uttar Pradesh

Keywords: Adolescents, International, Policy/Policy Development

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I have supervised the project and have worked at a ploicy level to promote integrated programs for adolescents
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.