246159 Understanding hypertension and diabetes management for urban Black men

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Kayshin Chan, MPH , Research & Evaluation, Public Health Management Corporation, Philadelphia, PA
Archana Bodas LaPollo, MPH , Research & Evaluation, Public Health Management Corporation, Philadelphia, PA
Lee Carson, MSW, CASAC , Research & Evaluation, Public Health Management Corporation, Philadelphia, PA
Aqeel Dix, MPH , Program Coordinator, Health Promotion Council, Philadelphia, PA
Yeamah Logan , Research & Evaluation, Public Health Management Corporation, Philadelphia, PA
Stephanie Martin , Research & Evaluation, Public Health Management Corporation, Philadelphia, PA
Jennifer L. Lauby, PhD , Research & Evaluation, Public Health Management Corporation, Philadelphia, PA
Background: Hypertension and diabetes disproportionately affect Black men due to risk factors for poor health outcomes, such as decreased access to health care and low health literacy. As part of an AHRQ-funded project to develop appropriate health materials for this population, we conducted qualitative research to understand the informational needs and preferences of hard-to-reach Black men. We assessed barriers and supports for management of hypertension and diabetes, tools that facilitate patient-provider communication, and information that Black men need to know to manage their conditions.

Methods: Five focus groups were conducted with 52 men who had hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Participants were recruited from clinics, the local correctional system, homeless shelters, and faith-based organizations. Additionally, we conducted 13 interviews with healthcare and social service providers to understand their perspective about chronic disease management for Black men.

Results: One theme that emerged was the importance of patients being proactive about their health since many men have complicated medication regimens and constant medication adjustments. Men also reported difficulties with following recommended diets, particularly if they lived in a shelter or jail. Despite difficult life circumstances and competing needs (lack of employment, housing, or insurance), men still prioritized taking care of their health. Some kept log books to track health records and wrote down questions for their doctors before appointments. Participants said that medication adherence, nutrition, and exercise were significant health topics that Black men should know about. Other key findings about disease management and information preferences will be discussed in the presentation.

Learning Areas:
Assessment of individual and community needs for health education
Chronic disease management and prevention
Conduct evaluation related to programs, research, and other areas of practice
Diversity and culture
Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs

Learning Objectives:
1) Describe informational needs for Black men diagnosed with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes. 2) Compare patientsí and healthcare providersí perspectives about patient self-management of chronic disease.

Keywords: Chronic Diseases, Health Disparities

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am one of the lead staff on the research project and have conducted the focus group analysis for the presentation. I have worked in the area of chronic disease health education programs since 2008.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.