247628 Determining key factors for increasing health promotion participation: A qualitative exploration of African American males' health perspectives

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

David Mount, PsyD, MA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Darin Johnson, BA, BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC
Maria Isabel Rego, BA , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Alethea Amponsah, BA BS , Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston Salem, NC
Background: Persistent biopsychosocial disparities faced by African American males and lack of information about challenges preventing health behavior practices among them suggest an ongoing need and priority for community outreach, research and education efforts focused on this group. Objective: This qualitative study explores African American males' perspectives through a church-based; community engagement forum using the Health Belief Model to identify factors influencing their participation in health promotion activities. Methods: Partnerships were formed with Piedmont Triad North Carolina community members, churches, local media, health educators, and academic and lay health care providers. Partnerships were fundamental in developing, implementing, and analyzing the semi-structured interview sessions. This study included 1) two forums related to biopsychosocial health disparities faced by African American males, 2) qualitative analysis (i.e., audio recordings, verbatim transcriptions, and theme coding) of forum sessions, 3) enlisting lay health professionals from the community to provide feedback about themes developed in this project. Results: Forum participants (N=68) ranged in ages from 15 years-old to 68 years-old, with an average age of 44 years-old (SD = 14.5). Five salient themes emerged: 1) Lack of Chronic Disease Awareness, 2) Fatalism, 3) Fear and Anxiety toward the Academic-Medical Setting, 4) Hyperactive Masculinity Fatigue, and 5) the Gay-Straight Divide. The term Tired Black Male Health Syndrome was coined and operationalized during the sessions. Conclusion: To increase African American male participation in health promotion activities, it may be necessary to integrate their health beliefs and perspectives into church-based interventions geared toward knowledge enhancement and misconception reduction.

Learning Areas:
Advocacy for health and health education
Chronic disease management and prevention
Diversity and culture

Learning Objectives:
Identify factors influencing health behavior promotion and of biopsychosocial health disparities prominent to the African American male Diaspora. Discuss the perspectives of African American male health beliefs; perceived barriers, benefits, and threats relative to participating in health behavior promotion. Formulate methods for translation of biopsychosocial findings to other research, education, administrative, or clinical settings.

Keywords: African American, Health Disparities

Presenting author's disclosure statement:

Qualified on the content I am responsible for because: I am qualified to present because I have been greatly involved in several different aspects of this project such as qualitative data coding, analysis, interpretation and conceptual model application.
Any relevant financial relationships? No

I agree to comply with the American Public Health Association Conflict of Interest and Commercial Support Guidelines, and to disclose to the participants any off-label or experimental uses of a commercial product or service discussed in my presentation.